Page 1 of 24 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 12 of 283
Electricians & Electrical Forum - ***Useful Information for Apprentices***
Like Tree2Likes

***Useful Information for Apprentices***

Discuss ***Useful Information for Apprentices*** in the Electrical Forum: General Electrical Forum at Tilers Forum; “ General Health and Safety at Work “ Question 1.1 What do the letters CDM stand for ? A: Control of Demolition and Management Regulations B: Control of Dangerous Materials ...
  1. #1
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Thumbs up ***Useful Information for Apprentices***

    “ General Health and Safety at Work “

    Question 1.1
    What do the letters CDM stand for ?
    A: Control of Demolition and Management Regulations
    B: Control of Dangerous Materials Regulations
    C: Construction (Demolition Management) Regulations
    D: Construction (Design and Management Regulations ) Answer: D )
    Question 1.2
    Identify one method of enforcing regulations that are
    available to the Health and Safety Executive:
    A: Health Notice
    B: Improvement Notice
    C: Obstruction Notice
    D: Increasing insurance premiums
    Answer: B Improvement notices require action to achieve standards which meet health and safety law :
    Question 1.3
    What happens if a Prohibition Notice is issued by an
    Inspector of the local authority or the HSE ?
    A: The work in hand can be completed, but no new work started
    B: The work can continue if adequate safety precautions are put in place
    C: The work that is subject to the notice must cease
    D: The work can continue, provided a risk assessment is carried out,
    Answer: C The work covered by a prohibition notice must cease until the identified danger is removed.
    Question 1.4
    Health and Safety Executive Inspector can ?
    A: Only visit if they have made an appointment
    B: Visit at any time
    C: Only visit if accompanied by the principal contractor
    D: Only visit to interview the site manager
    Answer: B Inspectors have a range of powers, including the right to visit premises at any time.
    Question 1.5
    A Prohibition Notice means:
    A: When you finish the work you must not start again
    B: The work must stop immediately
    C: Work is to stop for that day only
    D: Work may continue until the end of the day
    Answer: B The work activity covered by the prohibition notice must cease, until the identified danger is removed ,
    Question 1.6
    In what circumstances can an HSE Improvement Notice be issued ?
    A: If there is a breach of legal requirements
    B: By warrant through the police
    C: Only between Monday and Friday on site
    Answer: A Improvement notices require action to achieve standards which meet health and safety law .
    Question 1.7
    What is an “Improvement Notice”?
    A: A notice issued by the site principal contractor to tidy up the site
    B: A notice from the client to the principal contractor to speed up the work
    C: A notice issued by a Building Control Officer to deepen foundations
    D: A notice issued by an HSE/local authority Inspector to enforce compliance with health
    Answer: D Improvement notices require action to achieve standards which meet health and safety law .
    Question 1.8
    If a Health and Safety Executive Inspector issues a“ Prohibition Notice”, this means that:
    A: the Site Manager can choose whether or not to ignore the notice
    B: specific work activities, highlighted on the notice, must stop
    C: the HSE must supervise the work covered by the notice
    D: the HSE must supervise all work from then on
    Answer: B Prohibition notices are intended to Stop activities which can cause serious injury.
    Question 1.9
    Which one of the following items of information will you find on the Approved Health and Safety Law poster?
    A: Details of emergency escape routes
    B: The location of the local HSE office
    C: The location of all fire extinguishers
    D: The identity of the first aiders
    Answer: B The poster also lists the persons with health and safety responsibilities, but not first aiders.
    Question 1.10
    Who is responsible for signing a Company Safety Policy ?
    A: Site Manager
    B: Company Safety Officer
    C: Company Secretary
    D: Managing Director
    Answer: D The Health and Safety at Work Act requires the most senior member of management to sign the health and safety policy
    statement.

    Question 1.11
    Which one of the following must be in a company’s written Health and Safety Policy:
    A: Aims and objectives of the company
    B: Organisation and arrangements in force for carrying out the health and safety policy
    C: Name of the Health and Safety Adviser
    D: Company Director’s home address
    Answer: B This requirement appears in the Health and Safety at Work Act.
    Question 1.12
    Employers have to produce a written Health and Safety Policy statement when:
    A: A contract commences
    B: They employ five people or more
    C: The safety representative requests it
    D: The HSE notifies them
    Answer: B This is a specific requirement of the Health and Safety at Work Act.
    Question 1.13
    Companies employing five or more people must have a written Health and Safety Policy because:
    A: The principal contractor gives them work on site
    B: The HSAWA 1974 requires it
    C: The Social Security Act requires it
    D: The trade unions require it
    Answer: B
    Question 1.14
    What do the letters HSC stand for ?
    A: Health and Safety Contract
    B: Health and Safety Consultant
    C: Health and Safety Conditions
    D: Health and Safety Commission Answer: D
    Question 1.15
    Which ONE of the following statements is correct ? The Health and Safety Executive is:
    A: a prosecuting authority
    B: an enforcing authority
    C: a statutory provisions authority
    Answer: B The Health and Safety Executive enforces health and safety legislation.
    Question 1.16
    The Health and Safety at Work Act requires employers to provide what for their employees?
    A: Adequate rest periods
    B: Payment for work done
    C: A safe place of work
    D: Suitable transport to work
    Answer: C This is a specific requirement of Section 2 of the Health and Safety at Work Act.
    Question 1.17
    The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and any regulations made under the Act are:
    A: Not compulsory, but should be complied with if convenient
    B: Advisory to companies and individuals
    C: Practical advice for the employer to follow
    D: Legally binding Answer: D
    Question 1.18
    Under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which of the following have a duty to work safely?
    A: Employees only
    B: The general public
    C: Employers only
    D: All people at work
    Answer: D Employers, employees and the self-employed all have a duty to work safely under the Act.
    Question 1.19
    What is the MAXIMUM penalty that a Higher Court, can currently impose for a breach of the Health and Safety at Work Act?
    A: £20,000 fine and two years imprisonment
    B: £15,000 fine and three years imprisonment
    C: £1,000 fine and six months imprisonment
    D: Unlimited fine and two years imprisonment
    Answer: D A Lower Court can impose a fine of up to £20,000 and/or up to six months imprisonment for certain offences. The potential fine in a Higher Court, however, is unlimited and the term of imprisonment can be up to 2 years.
    Question 1.20
    What do the letters ACoP stand for ?
    A: Accepted Code of Provisions
    B: Approved Condition of Practice
    C: Approved Code of Practice
    D: Accepted Code of Practice
    Answer: C An ACOP is a code of practice approved by the Health and Safety Commission.

    Question 1.21
    Where should you look for Official advice on health and safety matters?
    A: A set of health and safety guidelines provided by suppliers
    B: The health and safety rules as laid down by the employer
    C: Guidance issued by the Health and Safety Executive
    D: A professionally approved guide book on regulations
    Answer: C The HSE is the UK enforcing body and its guidance can be regarded as ‘official’
    Question 1.22
    Regulations that govern health and safety on construction sites:
    A: apply only to inexperienced workers
    B: do not apply during ’out of hours’ working
    C: apply only to large companies
    D: are mandatory ( that is, compulsory )
    Answer: D The requirements of health and safety law are mandatory, and failure to follow them can lead to prosecutions.
    Question 1.23
    Which of the following statements is correct ?
    A: The duty for health and safety falls only on the employer
    B: All employees must take reasonable care, not only to protect themselves but also their colleagues
    C: Employees have no responsibility for Health and Safety on site
    D: Only the client is responsible for safety on site
    Answer: B The responsibility for management of Health and Safety Act at Work rests with the employer
    Question 1.25
    Which of the following is correct for risk assessment?
    A: It is a good idea but not essential
    B: Only required to be done for hazardous work
    C: Must always be done
    D: Only required on major jobs
    Answer: C There is a legal requirement for all work to be suitably risk assessed.
    Question 1.26
    In the context of a risk assessment, what do you understand by the term risk?
    A: An unsafe act or condition
    B: Something with the potential to cause injury
    C: Any work activity that can be described as dangerous
    D: The likelihood that harm from a particular hazard will occur
    Answer: D Hazard and risk are not the same. Risk reflects the chance of being harmed by a hazard
    Question 1.27
    Who would you expect to carry out a risk assessment on your working site?
    A: The site planning supervisor
    B: A visiting HSE Inspector
    C: The construction project designer
    D: A competent person
    Answer: D A risk assessment must be conducted by a 'competent person’.
    Question 1.28
    What is a HAZARD ?
    A: Where an accident is likely to happen
    B: An accident waiting to happen
    C: Something with the potential to cause harm
    D: The likelihood of something going wrong
    Answer: C Examples of hazards include: a drum of acid, breeze blocks on an elevated plank; cables running across a floor.
    Question 1.29
    What must be done before any work begins ?
    A: Emergency plan
    B: Assessment of risk
    C: Soil assessment
    D: Geological survey
    Answer: B This is a legal requirement of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations.
    Question 1.30
    Complete the following sentence: A risk assessment
    A: is a piece of paper required by law
    B: prevents accidents
    C: is a means of analysing what might go wrong
    D: isn’t particularly useful
    Answer: C Risk assessment involves a careful review of what can cause harm and the practical measures to be taken to reduce the risk of harm.
  2. Last edited by amberleaf; 27-07-2009 at 08:36 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  3. The Following 15 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), ebow72 (04-05-2011), French Liam (14-12-2010), G0ld L33 (14-08-2012), hammerwell08 (20-01-2012), jimmyray (03-09-2012), kerry (17-04-2011), kowalski (09-03-2011), Luke123 (20-07-2012), manda (09-10-2010), paul341 (11-12-2010), petlac (22-07-2011), skamuk (31-03-2013)

  4. #2
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: Useful Information for Apprentices

    Question 1.31
    Why would your supervisor ask you to read the method statement and risk assessment before you start your next job?
    A: He thinks you have got nothing better to do
    B: They contain information on how to carry out the job in a safe manner
    C: He wouldn’t, he thinks they are a waste of time
    D: As someone has taken the time and trouble to write them, you might as well read them
    Answer: B The supervisor must, by law, keep workers advised of significant risks, and control measures.
    Question 1.32
    What do the blue and white health and safety signs tell you?
    A: Things you must do
    B: The nearest fire exit
    C: The hazards in the area
    D: Things you must not do
    Answer: A Blue and white signs show a ‘mandatory’ requirement.
    Question 1.33
    What colours are fire exit signs ?
    A: Green and white
    B: Red and yellow
    C: Red and white
    D: Blue and white
    Answer: A The colours are prescribed in the Health and Safety ( Safety Signs and Signals ) Regulations.
    Question 1.34
    What is the main colour on a safety sign stating that
    you must NOT do something?
    A: Blue
    B: Green
    C: Red
    D: Yellow
    Answer: C Prohibitory signs are round and feature a black pictogram on a white background with red edging and
    diagonal line.
    Question 1.35
    The Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations require the colour coding of signs. What
    colours are used on a sign indicating a warning, for example "Fork-lift trucks operating”?
    A: Blue and white
    B: Green and white
    C: Yellow and black
    D: Red and white
    Answer: C Warning signs are triangular and feature a black pictogram on a yellow background with black edging.
    Question 1.36
    The Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations require the colour coding of safety signs.
    What colours are used on a sign indicating a prohibited activity, for example “No access for pedestrians”?
    A: Green and white
    B: Red, black and white
    C: Blue and white
    D: Yellow and black
    Answer: B Prohibitory signs are round and feature a black pictogram on a white background with red edging and
    diagonal line.
    Question 1.37
    The Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals ) Regulations require the colour coding of safety signs.
    What colours are used on a sign indicating a mandatory activity, for example “Safety helmets must be worn
    A: Green and white
    B: Red, black and white
    C: Blue and white
    D: Yellow and black
    Answer: C Mandatory signs are round and feature a white pictogram on a blue background.
    Question 1.38
    The Health and Safety ( Safety Signs and Signals ) Regulations require the colour coding of safety signs.
    What colours are used on a sign indicating a safe condition, for example “First Aid kit”?
    A: Red, black and white
    B: Blue and white
    C: Yellow and black
    D: Green and white
    Answer: D Emergency escape and first-aid signs are rectangular or square and feature a white pictogram on a green
    background.
    Question 1.39
    Why should regular inspections of the workplace take place ?
    A: To check whether the working environment is safe
    B: To check that all employees are present
    C: To check that everyone is doing their job
    D: To prepare for a visit from an HSE Inspector
    Answer: A
    Question 1.40
    How can you help to prevent accidents ?
    A: Don’t report them
    B: Know how to get help quickly
    C: Report any unsafe conditions
    D: Know where the first-aid kit is kept
    Answer: C Action to improve safety can only be taken if the risk is known about. Employees have a duty of care to other employees.

    Electrotechnical
    You should have an understanding of:
    • The effects of electric current on the body
    • The types of socket outlets used on construction sites
    • The need for persons working on electrical systems to be competent to do so
    • The use of residual current devices for supplementary protection against electric shock
    • Safe isolation procedures when working on electrical systems and equipment
    • Only working ‘live’ in exceptional circumstances
    • Safe working with optical fibres

    Question 10.1
    In considering whether to work live a responsible person should
    A: carry out a risk assessment
    B: only work dead
    C: only work live
    D: do as the client demands
    Answer: A To identify and assess the risks involved and the methods of controlling them.
    Question 10.2
    The normal procedure for working on electrical equipment should be which one of the following?
    A: Dead working
    B: Wearing insulated gloves
    C: Using insulated tools
    D: Live working
    Answer: A Dead working should be considered as the norm and work on or near live conductors should rarely be permitted
    Question 10.3
    Test instruments used for working on electrical systems should:
    A: be yellow in colour
    B: be less than 10 years old
    C: have non-insulated test probes
    D: have insulated test probes
    Answer: D To protect the user from electric shock whilst using the instrument ie handling the probes.
    Question 10.4
    Under the Electricity at Work Regulations, live working is considered:
    A: as entirely acceptable
    B: to be normally permitted
    C: only to be allowed in exceptional circumstances
    D: never to be allowed
    Answer: C Extra controls must be employed, including training, supervision and use of suitable tools and protective equipment.
    Question 10.5
    Which of the following would you use to replace the fuse in a plug if fuses were NOT available ?
    A: A nail
    B: A piece of silver paper
    C: A bit of wire
    D: None of the options mentioned
    Answer: D A fuse is often the main safety device in an electrical circuit. A blown fuse must only be replaced by a fuse of the correct type and rating.
    Question 10.6
    To prove a circuit or equipment is dead after isolation what is the FIRST activity in the sequence of events ?
    A: Make sure equipment is not working
    B: Check between phase and earth
    C: Check proving instrument is working on known live source
    D: Check between phase and neutral
    Answer: C To prove that the voltage detector (such as a two-pole voltage detector, proprietary test lamp or voltmeter with insulated probes and fused leads) is working, i.e. indicating voltage.
    Question 10.7
    The nominal single phase voltage in the UK is ?
    A: 230 volts
    B: 240 volts
    C: 415 volts
    D: 400 volts
    Answer: A This is nominal voltage for public electricity supply systems within Europe.

    Question 10.8
    When is live working permissible?
    A: When the person carrying out the work is a competent person
    B: When it is unreasonable in all circumstances for the equipment to be made dead and
    suitable precautions are taken
    C: When the means of isolation cannot be identified
    D: When the person working on the equipment is wearing rubber gloves
    Answer: B This is a requirement under r.14 of the EAW Regulations. However, it does not mean that live working is then ’safe’
    Question 10.9
    The FIRST step in the first aid procedure in the event of a person receiving an electric shock is:
    A: take steps to remove the person from the live source
    B: check airway, breathing and circulation
    C: send for help
    D: give the person mouth to mouth resuscitation
    Answer: A Turn off the power if possible. Do not touch the person. Attempt to separate them from the source with a non-conducting object, such as a stick or broom.
    Question 10.10
    The specific effects on the human body of a major electric shock are one of the following:
    A: dermatitis
    B: burns and cardiac arrest
    C: broken bones
    D: chest pains
    Answer: B
    Question 10.11
    The lowest level of electrical current which can harm the human body is normally measured in:
    A: microamps
    B: kiloamps
    C: amps
    D: milliamps
    Answer: D Research has shown that a person is in serious danger of a fatal electric shock at, or above, approximately 30 milliamps.
    Question 10.12
    With regard to the effect of electrical current on the human body, one of the following is correct:
    A: a 5 amp circuit breaker should prevent a person receiving a fatal electric shock
    B: a 3 amp fuse should prevent a person receiving a fatal electric shock
    C: a 30mA Residual Current Device (RCD) should prevent a person receiving a fatal electric shock.
    D: a 5 amp rewireable fuse should prevent a person receiving a fatal electric shock
    Answer: C An RCD is a mechanical switching device intended to cause the opening of the contacts when the residual current attains a given value under specified conditions.
    Question 10.13
    Where mains voltage is used to supply portable equipment, what additional protection is recommended?
    A: Step-down transformer
    B: Step-down generator
    C: Cable avoidance tool
    D: Residual current device
    Answer: D A residual current device (RCD) does not guarantee safety and it is possible to suffer an electric shock or injury although it is operating correctly. Reduced low voltage systems (e.g. 110 volt centre point earthed) give more reliable protection against fatal electric shock.
    Question 10.14
    What colour cable USUALLY signifies 110 volt power supply on site ?
    A: Black
    B: Red
    C: Blue
    D: Yellow
    Answer: D Yellow is the usual colour of cables, socket outlets, plugs, transformers etc which are used with a 110 volt supply.
    Question 10.15
    A portable electric generator on site has two power outlets, 110 volts and 230 volts. What colour would the 110 volt outlet be ?
    A: Black
    B: Yellow
    C: Red
    D: Blue
    Answer: B Yellow is the usual colour of cables, socket outlets, plugs, transformers etc which are used with a 110 volt supply.
    Question 10.16
    What colour power outlet on a portable generator would supply 110 volts?
    A: Black
    B: Blue
    C: Red
    D: Yellow
    Answer: D Yellow is the usual colour of cables, socket outlets, plugs, transformers etc which are used with a 110 volt supply.
  5. Last edited by amberleaf; 27-07-2009 at 09:01 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  6. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), French Liam (14-12-2010), jmusson1989 (04-02-2012), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (17-11-2010), paul341 (11-12-2010), petlac (22-07-2011), skamuk (31-03-2013)

  7. #3
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: Useful Information for Apprentices

    Question 10.17
    What action should you take if a workmate gets an electric shock ?
    A: Phone the electricity board immediately
    B: Dial 999 and ask for the fire brigade
    C: Cut off the power and call for help
    D: Try to pull them to safety
    Answer: C If you can switch the power off, the electric hazard will be removed. First aid assistance will then probably be required. Do not touch someone who is still in contact with live electrical cables as you could also receive an electric shock.
    Question 10.18
    A residual current device is designed to operate in the event of one of the following:
    A: overload
    B: earth fault
    C: lightning strike on the supply
    D: short-circuit
    Answer: B An RCD provides supplementary protection against direct contact of persons or livestock with live parts and reduces the risk of electric shock.
    Question 10.19
    Electrical installations on construction sites should be periodically inspected and tested:
    A: every 3 months
    B: every year
    C: every 6 months
    D: every month
    Answer: A 3 monthly inspections of construction site installations are recommended in IEE Guidance Note 3.
    Question 10.20
    The maximum AC voltage which the human body can withstand without long term physiological effects in dry conditions is:
    A: 110 volts
    B: 230 volts
    C: 50 volts
    D: 400 volts
    Answer: C Regarded as a non-fatal voltage level.
    Question 10.21
    Which of the following statements is true with regard to the dangers of electricity ?
    A: Electricity is perfectly safe so long as you wear cotton gloves
    B: Electricity is only dangerous if you are not wearing wellington boots
    C: Electricity is only dangerous in wet weather
    D: Electricity is dangerous at any time because you cannot tell by looking at a cable whether or not it is live
    Answer: D The features which make electricity so dangerous are that you cannot see, hear or smell it. It can give you a very unpleasant surprise. Always assume that cables are live. ←←←
    Question 10.22
    What is the most serious effect that electric shock can have if you come into contact with a live part ?
    A: The electric current can cause a slight tingling in the fingers
    B: The electric current can cause burn marks on the fingers
    C: The electric current can cause the heart to stop, resulting in death
    D: The electric current can cause the finger muscles to twitch
    Answer: C Contact with live electrical parts can be fatal. If you do not know otherwise, always assume that electrical parts are live.
    Question 10.23
    Your job involves you working near to hanging electrical cables which have bare ends. What should you do ?
    A: Touch the cables to see if they are live
    B: Carry on working, as there shouldn’t be a problem
    C: Inform your supervisor and keep well away
    D: Attempt to push the cables back into the ceiling void so that you can start work
    Answer: C You must always assume that exposed cables are live until you know they are not. Contact with live electrical cables can kill.
    Question 10.24
    For all live working activities it is necessary to:
    A: carry out a risk assessment
    B: wear rubber gloves only
    C: be accompanied
    D: keep your fingers crossed
    Answer: A
    Question 10.25
    An electrical Permit to Work is primarily a statement that:
    A: someone else has taken responsibility for the work
    B: the circuit or equipment is live
    C: certain instructions need to be followed
    D: the circuit or equipment has been isolated and is safe to work on
    Answer: D Permits to work describe the procedures that prevent a major hazard, such as electricity or moving machinery, from causing harm, usually by isolation to effectively
    ensure (in the case of electricity) ’dead’ working with no chance of it going ‘live’.
    Question 10.26
    Test instrument probes used for live testing on electrical systems should:
    A: be manufactured in the UK
    B: be accompanied by a calibration certificate
    C: be fused
    D: be coloured red
    Answer: C To protect the instrument from damage by overcurrent while in use, test probes should have suitable high breaking capacity (hbc) fuses with a low current rating (usually not exceeding 500 mA), or a current-limiting resistor and fuse.

    Question 10.27
    Which of the following does the Electricity at Work (EAW) regulations apply to ?
    A: All persons engaged for work purposes
    B: Self employed persons only
    C: Employees only
    D: Employers only
    Answer: A The EAW Regulations impose duties on employers employees and the self employed.
    Question 10.28
    The Electricity at Work Regulations require that:
    A: persons working with electricity must have the appropriate level of knowledge and experience
    B: a training course is necessary before anyone can work with electricity
    C: only electricians can work with electricity
    D: anyone supervised can work with electricity
    Answer: A Competency is a requirement of r.16 of the EAW Regulations.
    Question 10.29
    The Electricity at Work Regulations apply to:
    A: only low voltage systems
    B: only extra-low voltage systems
    C: all voltage systems
    D: only high voltage systems
    Answer: C The EAW Regulations cover the safe use of electricity in work activities, irrespective of voltage.
    Question 10.30
    Which of the following should not be used to prove a circuit or equipment is dead after isolation?
    A: A two-pole voltage detector
    B: A proprietary test lamp
    C: A suitable voltmeter
    D: A multimeter
    Answer: D The use of multimeters, which can be incorrectly set, has often caused accidents and should not be used on electrical power systems.
    Question 10.31
    Which of the following is not a suitable means of isolating a circuit ?
    A: Removing a fuse and locking the distribution board
    B: Putting insulating tape over the circuit breaker
    C: Padlocking the isolating switch
    D: Fitting a padlocked circuit breaker lockout
    Answer: B The isolating device should be switched off or the fuse removed. The switch, circuit breaker or enclosure should then be locked and the key removed. A notice or label should also be posted to warn that someone is working
    on the circuit or apparatus.
    Question 10.32
    Which of the following work procedures on electrical systems will always require a permit-to-work to be issued ?
    A: Dead working on low-voltage systems
    B: Live working on low-voltage systems
    C: Dead working on high-voltage systems
    D: Live working on high-voltage systems
    Answer: C An electrical permit-to-work should state what circuit or equipment has been made safe, how that has been achieved and what work is to be done. A permit should not, therefore, be used for live working. Such a permit is
    always required for work on high-voltage systems, but can also be used for low-voltage systems.
    Question 10.33
    Optical fibre cable remnants should not be left lying around on site because:
    A: They can be hot and burn upon contact
    B: Laser beams still exist in the cut pieces
    C: They can pierce the skin or eyes
    D: They are toxic
    Answer: C Fibre fragments can enter the bloodstream and cause infections in the skin or eyes. All fibre waste, particularly small pieces, should be placed in suitable receptacles.
    Question 10.34
    Why should the end of an optical fibre cable never be pointed towards your own or anyone else’s eyes ?
    A: The beam can transfer a strong electric current
    B: The colour of the beam is very hypnotic
    C: The beam can bore a hole through the skin
    D: The beam can damage the eyes
    Answer: D Exposure to light sources such as lasers or highly concentrated visible or infrared light beams, associated with the testing or use of optical fibres, can cause damage to the eyes, or even blindness.
    Last edited by amberleaf; 27-07-2009 at 09:46 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  8. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (17-11-2010), paul341 (11-12-2010), petlac (22-07-2011), skamuk (31-03-2013)

  9. #4
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: Useful Information for Apprentices

    REPORTING ACCIDENTS
    Question 3.1
    What should you ensure if you suffer an injury through a manual handling operation?
    A: You get paid for the job
    B: The injury is recorded
    C: You get help and carry on working
    D: You take time off work
    Answer: B All injuries must be recorded in the Company accident book
    Question 3.2
    Why should a serious accident be reported?
    A: It helps the site find out what caused it
    B: It is a legal requirement
    C: So that the site manager can see who is to blame
    D: So that the company will be held responsible
    Answer: B Serious accidents (major injuries or those resulting in an absence of over 3 days) must be reported to the enforcing authority under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)
    Question 3.3
    What immediate action should you take if you suffer an injury through carrying a load?
    A: Advise your doctor of your injury
    B: Tell your supervisor or employer
    C: Tell your working companion
    D: Carry on working as best you can
    Answer: B All injuries must be recorded in the Company accident book
    Question 3.4
    Under RIDDOR, which one of the following must be reported?
    A: Accidents where the injured person wishes to make a claim
    B: Fracture other than to fingers, thumbs or toes
    C: All ‘near misses’ even if no one was hurt
    D: All accidents causing any injury
    Answer: B This is classified as a ‘reportable major injury’ and must be reported to the enforcing authority under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)
    Question 3.5
    Which one of the following have the power to examine an accident record?
    A: The HSE inspector
    B: An insurance company
    C: A doctor
    D: A workmate
    Answer: A HSE inspectors have a range of powers, including this one.
    Question 3.6
    Which of the following should be recorded following an accident?
    A: The date and time the accident occurred
    B: Your date of birth
    C: The weather conditions
    D: Your National Insurance Number
    Answer: A The information to be entered in an accident book (BI 510) includes when and where the accident happened, the name, address and occupation of the person who had the accident and details of how the accident happened and the injuries suffered. The weather conditions would only be included if they contributed to the accident
    Question 3.7
    Which one of the following accounts for most accidents each year on construction sites?
    A: Struck by moving vehicles
    B: Electrocution
    C: Trench collapses
    D: Slips, trips and falls
    Answer: D HSE statistics show clearly that there are more slips, trips and falls than any other type of accident on site.
    Question 3.8
    Which one of the following is NOT classified as a major injury under RIDDOR?
    A: A fractured finger
    B: Fractured arm
    C: Temporary loss of eyesight
    D: Broken wrist
    Answer: A RIDDOR excludes fractures to fingers, thumbs or toes from the definition of ‘reportable major injuries’
    Question 3.9
    Which one of the following should you do if you witness a serious accident on site?
    A: Pretend you saw nothing
    B: Say nothing in case you get in trouble
    C: Discuss what to do with your workmates
    D: Tell your supervisor what you saw happening
    Answer: D If the supervisor is aware of an accident he can take steps to prevent a recurrence. The employer also has
    legal duties to report certain incidents to the enforcing authority.
    Question 3.10
    A workmate tells you that he witnessed an accident the previous day and the victim was taken to hospital. He
    asks you for advice on what he should do. Do you tell him to:
    A: speak to the site nurse about what he saw
    B: tell his supervisor that he saw what happened
    C: telephone the hospital to find out how the injured person is
    D: say nothing to anyone in case he gets someone in trouble
    Answer: B If the supervisor is aware of an accident he can take steps to prevent a recurrence. The employer also has
    legal duties to report certain incidents to the enforcing authority.

    Question 3.11
    If a person at work suffers an injury (other than a major injury) due to an accident at work, it is reportable under
    RIDDOR if they are incapacitated for work for:
    A: Over 1 day
    B: Over 3 days
    C: Over half a day
    D: Over 2 days
    Answer: B An over-three-day injury is one which is not major but results in the injured person being away from work or
    unable to do the full range of their normal duties for more than three days (including any days they wouldn’t
    normally be expected to work such as weekends, rest days or holidays) not counting the day of the injury itself.
    Question 3.12
    What must an employer do with their accident records following completion of a construction project?
    A: They are sent to the Health and Safety Executive
    B: They are destroyed on site with other non-essential documents
    C: They are kept safe by the employer
    D: They are sent to the employer’s insurance company
    Answer: C Accident records must be kept by an employer for at least three years.
    Question 3.13
    At work who would you report a dangerous occurrence to?
    A: The emergency services
    B: Your supervisor or employer
    C: Another employee
    D: The client for the project
    Answer: B Under RIDDOR, an employer has a legal duty to report certain work-related accidents, but to do this they will need to know that an accident has occurred.
    Question 3.14
    Following a reportable dangerous occurrence when must the enforcing authority be informed?
    A: Within 5 days
    B: Within 48 hours
    C: Without delay
    D: Within 24 hours
    Answer: C The enforcing authority must be notified forthwith by the quickest practicable means and a report must also be sent to them within 10 days.
    Question 3.15
    Accidents causing any injury should always be recorded in:
    A: The site engineer’s day book
    B: Your employer’s accident recording system
    C: Your personal diary
    D: The main contractor’s diary
    Answer: B All accidents should be recorded in the accident book
    Question 3.16
    Which one of the following is classed as an occupational disease under RIDDOR?
    A: Mental disorder
    B: Asbestosis
    C: Amputation
    D: Influenza
    Answer: B Asbestosis is a reportable disease under RIDDOR.
    Question 3.17
    When a person is injured at work, who should enter the details in the accident book?
    A: The injured person’s supervisor
    B: The injured person or anyone acting for them
    C: The site manager or engineer
    D: The site safety manager
    Answer: B This is the procedure for recording accidents internally in the accident book
    Question 3.18
    If you are involved in a minor accident at work, whose duty is it to report it to site management?
    A: Any witness to the accident
    B: The police, fire or ambulance who attend
    C: It is your own responsibility
    D: The site foreman should report it
    Answer: C Employers rely on employees to advise them of occurrences at work.
    Question 3.19
    You have suffered an accident which has made you incapable of your normal work for over 3 days
    Which of the following actions MUST be taken by your. employer?
    A: The emergency services are asked to attend the site
    B: The local hospital is informed
    C: The relevant enforcing authority is informed
    D: A deduction is made from your wages for days lost
    Answer: C An over-three-day injury is one which is not major but results in the injured person being away from work or
    unable to do the full range of their normal duties for more than three days (including any days they wouldn’t normally be expected to work such as weekends, rest days or holidays) not counting the day of the injury itself.
    Question 3.20
    The collapse of scaffolding is only notifiable as a dangerous occurrence when the scaffolding is which one of the following?
    A: Over 15 metres in height
    B: Any height
    C: Over 10 metres in height
    D: Over 5 metres in height
    Answer: D This is one of the requirements of RIDDOR.
    Last edited by amberleaf; 27-07-2009 at 12:34 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  10. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (21-11-2010), petlac (22-07-2011), skamuk (31-03-2013)

  11. #5
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: Useful Information for Apprentices

    Question 3.21
    If there is a fatal accident on site, when must the Health and Safety Executive be informed?
    A: Without delay
    B: Within 10 days
    C: Within 7 days
    D: Within 5 days
    Answer: A The enforcing authority must be notified without delay by the quickest practicable means and a report must also be sent to them within 10 days.
    Question 3.22
    When must an accident be recorded in the site’s accident book?
    A: When an accident causes damage to plant or equipment
    B: Only when a person is injured and will be off work for more than three days
    C: When the injury is serious enough for first aid to be needed.
    D: When an accident causes injury to an employee while at work
    Answer: D An accident causing an injury to an employee at work should be recorded in the accident book
    Question 3.23
    Which of the following have to be entered into the accident book?
    A: All accidents causing any damage
    B: All accidents causing an injury
    C: Only accidents causing serious injury
    D: Only accidents causing time off work
    Answer: B An accident causing an injury to an employee at work should be recorded in the accident book
    Question 3.24
    When must injury accidents be recorded?
    A: Only if you break a bone
    B: Only if you have time off work
    C: Any time they occur
    D: Only if you need to go to hospital
    Answer: C An accident causing an injury to an employee at work should be recorded in the accident book
    Question 3.25
    An entry must be made in the accident book when:
    A: the person has been off sick for three days
    B: management thinks it is appropriate
    C: an accident causes personal injury to an employee
    D: the severity of the accident may result in a compensation claim
    Answer: C An accident causing an injury to an employee at work should be recorded in the accident book
    Question 3.26
    Which of the following MUST be recorded in an accident book?
    A: Your National Insurance number
    B: Your date of birth
    C: Your occupation
    D: Your phone number
    Answer: C The information to be entered in an accident book includes when and where the accident happened
    the name, address and occupation of the person who had the accident and details of how the accident happened
    and the injuries suffered.
    Question 3.27
    Which of the following can you learn from an accident?
    A: A combination of human error and mechanical failure always causes injury
    B: Ideas on how you would prevent it happening again
    C: That mechanical failures are most dangerous
    D: How human error is always a cause
    Answer: B An accident investigation should not only assess the cause, but also howsimilar accidents can be prevented in the future.
    Question 3.28
    Could making an entry in the accident book help you if you later make a claim for compensation?
    A: Only if it is a serious injury
    B: No
    C: Only in the event of a fatality
    D: Yes
    Answer: D This is laid down in Social Security Legislation.
    Question 3.29
    Why is it important to report ’near miss’ accidents to your employer?
    A: It’s the law
    B: To make the figures look good
    C: So lessons can be learned, preventing an accident next time
    D: So that someone can be disciplined
    Answer: C The HSE advises that ‘near misses’ should be investigated to prevent their recurrence.
    Question 3.30
    Who should you report serious accidents to?
    A: Your workmate
    B: Your employer or supervisor
    C: The police
    D: The ambulance service
    Answer: B If the supervisor is aware of an accident he can take steps to prevent a recurrence. The employer also has
    legal duties to report certain incidents to the enforcing authority.

    Question 3.31
    What is the aim of carrying out an accident investigation?
    A: To determine the cause(s) and prevent a re-occurrence
    B: To establish what injuries were sustained
    C: To find out who is at fault
    D: To establish the cost of any damage incurred
    Answer: A An accident investigation should not only assess the cause, but also how similar accidents can be prevented in the future.
    Question 3.32
    You have witnessed a serious accident on your site, and are interviewed by an HSE inspector. Should you:
    A: tell the inspector what your mates say you should tell him
    B: ask your supervisor what you should say to the inspector
    C: co-operate fully with the inspector and tell him exactly what you saw
    D: don’t tell him anything
    Answer: C This is good practice, but it can also be an offence to withhold important information from an inspector.

    Personal Protective Equipment at Work
    Question 4.1
    When working in dusty conditions, what of the following would give the LEAST level of protection?
    A: Compressed airline breathing helmet
    B: Positive pressure powered respirator
    C: Self contained breathing apparatus
    D: Half mask dust respirator
    Answer: D Protection factors are given in HSE publication HSG53‘Respiratory protective equipment at work – A practical guide’
    Question 4.2
    In hot weather which one of the following is correct with regard to safety helmets?
    A: You can take off your helmet while working inside the building
    B: You must continue to wear your helmet
    C: You can drill holes in your safety hat for ventilation
    D: You do not need to wear your helmet
    Answer: B The Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989 require suitable head protection to be worn unless there is no foreseeable risk of head injuries other than by the wearer falling, or when directed to do so by their employer or the person who controls their activities on site.
    Question 4.3
    Which one of the following should you do if your personal protective equipment (PPE) is damaged?
    A: Obtain new equipment when available
    B: Report to your Supervisor without delay
    C: Reduce the amount of time you use it
    D: Carry on working
    Answer: B Employees are required to report any defective PPE to their employer (PPE at Work Regulations 1992, Regulation 7)
    Question 4.4
    If personal protective equipment (PPE) is defective, what should you do?
    A: Complain to the Health and Safety Inspector
    B: Get your work mate to mend it if possible
    C: Report it to your supervisor
    D: Repair if possible and continue to use it
    Answer: C Employees are required to report any defective PPE to their employer (PPE at Work Regulations 1992, Regulation 7)
    Question 4.5
    In normal use, what item of PPE is NOT essential for the operator of a cartridge-operated tool ?
    A: Safety eyewear
    B: Hearing protection
    C: Wellington boots
    D: Safety helmet
    Answer: C Wellingtons do not offer protection against the risks associated with the use of a cartridge-operated tool.
    Question 4.6
    Can you opt out of wearing personal protective equipment (PPE)?
    A: Yes, by informing the site supervisor
    B: Yes, by writing officially to your employer
    C: No, you cannot opt out
    D: Yes, if it is uncomfortable
    Answer: C You cannot legally “opt out” of being protected from significant risks at work. This includes wearing the necessary PPE.
    Question 4.7
    What is the most important item of personal protective equipment (PPE) when working on or near a highway?
    A: Safety footwear
    B: Waterproof clothing
    C: Hard hat
    D: High visibility vest
    Answer: D The other PPE may also be required.
    Question 4.8
    If you are drilling into concrete with a masonry drill, in which one of the following circumstances will you need to wear eye protection?
    A: Always
    B: Only when drilling overhead
    C: Only if the drill is bigger than 10mm
    D: Not if drilling into the floor
    Answer: A Suitable eye protection must always be worn when working with power-driven tools where chippings are likely to fly or abrasive materials could be propelled.
    Question 4.9
    When must you wear all personal protective equipment (PPE) provided by your employer?
    A: As instructed by your employer
    B: Only if it fits
    C: When you want to
    D: Only when you need to
    Answer: A Under the PPE at Work Regulations 1992, employees must wear PPE as instructed.
    Question 4.10
    When MUST an employer provide personal protective equipment (PPE)?
    A: To protect against a risk of harm that cannot be controlled another way
    B: Twice a year
    C: If the client or main contractor specifies it in the contract
    D: Every 5 years
    Answer: A When using a cartridge-operated tool, such as a nail gun, shatter proof goggles should be worn.
    Last edited by amberleaf; 27-07-2009 at 10:23 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  12. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), manda (21-11-2010), skamuk (31-03-2013)

  13. #6
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: Useful Information for Apprentices

    Question 4.12
    Which of the following must your safety helmet comply with to meet with the requirements of the Construction (Head Protection) Regulations?
    A: Be suitable for you
    B: Be a good visible colour
    C: Be stamped with the maker’s name
    D: Be less than 1 year old
    Answer: A An assessment of the suitability of head protection would include consideration of whether it can be adjusted to suit the individual who is to wear it, that it is compatible with the work to be done and that is comfortable to wear.
    Question 4.13
    In which of the following ways should you wear your safety helmet?
    A: With the peak raised to deflect falling material
    B: With the helmet back to front
    C: With the peak raised to give good vision
    D: Square on your head, properly adjusted
    Answer: D Employees are required to wear head protection properly under the Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989.
    Question 4.14
    When an employee has been issued with eye protection, what are their duties under the Personal
    Protective Equipment at Work Regulations?
    A: To ensure that they are the right type of protector
    B: Not to loan the equipment to other operatives
    C: To use the protection in accordance with training and instruction
    D: To pay for replacement of lost eye protection
    Answer: C Regulation 10(2) requires that every employee shall use any PPE in accordance with the training and instruction received.
    Question 4.15
    When should you wear safety footwear on site?
    A: Only when working on scaffolds
    B: When there is a risk of a foot injury
    C: Only when working outdoors
    D: Only if the site conditions are wet
    Answer: B Suitable safety footwear should be worn if there is a risk of injury from objects falling onto the foot or sharp objects such as nails, penetrating the sole.
    Question 4.16
    With regard to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), which one of the following statements is true?
    A: If you do not use the personal protective equipment (PPE) provided you will probably not come to any harm
    B: Personal protective equipment (PPE) protects only the user from the dangers present
    C: Personal protective equipment (PPE) need only be provided if it is not too expensive
    D: Personal protective equipment (PPE) need only be used if it is available
    Answer: B PPE is there to protect the individual. Wearing PPE does not protect other people nearby.
    Question 4.17
    Which of the following statements is TRUE when an employer issues personal protective equipment (PPE)?
    A: The employer can charge you for the full cost of it
    B: The employer cannot charge you for it
    C: The employer can charge you for up to half the cost of it
    D: The employer can only charge you for it if you lose or damage it
    Answer: B Employers cannot charge for PPE such as hard hats, gloves, required by law (and the bulk of PPE is required by law).
    Question 4.18
    Which one of the following must apply to any hard hat provided ?
    A: It is CE - marked
    B: It is less than 5 years old
    C: It is less than 1 year old
    D: It is less than 2 years old
    Answer: A All PPE should be CE – marked, indicating that it meets the basic health and safety requirements
    Question 4.19
    When using personal protective equipment (PPE) legally you must do which of the following?
    A: Not interfere with it or misuse it
    B: Replace it at your own expense if it is damaged
    C: Return it to the manufacturer when damaged
    D: Clean it properly once a week
    Answer: A Interfering with or misusing items provided in the interests of health, safety or welfare is an offence under the HSW Act 1974 (section 8)
    Question 4.20
    If it is necessary for an employee to use personal protective equipment, who has a duty to provide it?
    A: The trade union
    B: The employee
    C: The employer
    D: The principal contractor
    Answer: C This is a requirement of the PPE at Work Regulations 1992 (Regulation 4 ).
    Question 4.21
    When should a safety helmet be worn on site?
    A: At all times unless there is no foreseeable risk of injury to the head other than by falling.
    B: When you are out in the open air
    C: When walking to and from a place of work
    D: Only when something may fall
    Answer: A The circumstances when there is no foreseeable risk of head injury from falling or swinging objects or striking the head against something will be very limited in most construction work.

    Question 4.22
    A colleague has drilled holes in the top of his safety helmet because the weather is hot. Is this:
    A: acceptable if the holes are small
    B: his choice
    C: acceptable
    D: in breach of legal requirements
    Answer: D Interfering with or misusing items provided in the interests of health, safety or welfare is an offence under the HSW Act 1974 (section 8).
    Question 4.23
    Who has a duty to provide PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) for use by an employee?
    A: the employer
    B: the principal contractor
    C: the employee
    D: the client
    Answer: A This is a requirement of the PPE at Work Regulations 1992 (Regulation 4 ).
    Question 4.24
    When would it be appropriate to wear a bump-cap instead of a safety helmet?
    A: When there is no foreseeable risk of injury from falling or swinging objects
    B: In warm weather
    C: When working in excavations
    D: When working on a ladder
    Answer: A Industrial scalp protectors (bump caps) can protect against striking fixed obstacles, scalping or entanglements. They do not provide suitable protection against falling or swinging objects.
    Question 4.25
    How can you protect your eyesight while working on site?
    A: By squinting
    B: By not looking directly at what you are doing
    C: By wearing the correct type of eye protection
    D: By wearing sunglasses
    Answer: C
    Question 4.26
    When should head protection be worn on a construction site?
    A: At all times except by those who are self employed
    B: Only when you feel like it
    C: At all times unless you are working on scaffold
    D: At all times unless there is no foreseeable risk of injury to the head other than by falling
    Answer: D This is a requirement of the Construction (Head Protection) Regulations
    Question 4.27
    Why should a high visibility vest be worn when working on roads?
    A: So road users and plant operators can see you
    B: Because you were told to do so
    C: Because it will keep you warm
    D: So that your mates can see you
    Answer: A Many workers are struck and injured, often seriously, by moving vehicles.
    Question 4.28
    When considering what measures to take to protect people’s health and safety, PPE should always be regarded as:
    A: the last resort
    B: the first line of defence
    C: the best way to tackle the job
    D: the only practical measure
    Answer: A Engineering controls and safe systems of work should always be considered first.
    Last edited by amberleaf; 27-07-2009 at 10:59 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  14. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (21-11-2010), skamuk (31-03-2013)

  15. #7
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: Useful Information for Apprentices

    Health and Hygiene
    Question 5.1
    Exposure to asbestos fibres may cause which one of the following ?
    A: Dermatitis
    B: Asthma
    C: Glandular fever
    D: Asbestosis
    Answer: D Breathing in asbestos fibres can also lead to a number of other diseases, including lung cancer and mesothelioma :
    Question 5.2
    Asbestos is suspected in the workplace, during renovation do you :
    A: Remove it
    B: Paint it
    C: Ignore it
    D: Seek guidance immediately
    Answer: D Competent advice must be sought, to prevent exposure to the worker or others, either at the time, or subsequently :
    Question 5.3
    Which of the following statements about asbestos is TRUE ?
    A: Asbestos is not really a hazard to health
    B: White asbestos is safe to use
    C: All asbestos can be a hazard to health
    D: Only brown and blue asbestos are a hazard to health
    Answer: C While blue and brown asbestos are most hazardous, white asbestos can also cause fatal diseases.
    Question 5.4
    While working you discover material you think could be asbestos. What should you do?
    A: Clear any dust and fragments, put them in a bin then carry on working
    B: Inform the site nurse
    C: Stop working immediately and report your suspicions to your supervisor
    D: Dampen the material to prevent further dust being created, then carry on working
    Answer: C It is essential to stop work if asbestos is found or suspected, and await competent advice on what to do next.
    Question 5.5
    Can you tell by the smell of a product whether it is likely to cause harm ?
    A: No
    B: Only within an enclosed space
    C: Yes
    D: Only if you have been trained
    Answer: A Many harmful substances have no smell
    Question 5.6
    How would you recognise a hazardous substance?
    A: By a symbol on the container
    B: By its smell
    C: The colour of the label on the container
    D: It will be in a suitable container
    Answer: A The Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations (CHIP) requires suppliers to provide information on the hazards of the chemicals they supply
    Question 5.7
    Which of the following does NOT cause skin problems?
    A: Bitumens
    B: Solvents
    C: Asbestos
    D: Epoxy resins
    Answer: C Asbestos is potentially very harmful if inhaled, but does not affect the skin significantly.
    Question 5.8
    When an assessment has been carried out under COSHH Regulations, the risks and control measures
    should be explained to:
    A: the operatives using the substance
    B: all employees on site
    C: the accounts department
    D: the person in charge of the stores
    Answer: A All those working with the hazardous substances in question need to know about any risks.
    Question 5.9
    If your hands are very dirty, what should you use to get them clean ?
    A: White Spirit
    B: Paraffin
    C: Soap and water
    D: Thinners
    Answer: C The other substances can remove natural oils from the skin.
    Question 5.10
    The presence of rats on site creates a risk of catching Weil’s disease. What is the EASIEST PRACTICAL
    MEASURE that you can take to discourage the presence of rats ?
    A: Avoid leaving scraps of food lying about
    B: Lay traps containing rat poison
    C: Contact the local Environmental Health Officer
    D: Bring a large cat on site
    Answer: A The easiest solution is to avoid leaving food around, since this is what attracts vermin.
    Question 5.11
    Why is personal hygiene so important?
    A: So you don’t smell
    B: Because the COSHH regulations require it
    C: To protect your own and others’ health
    D: To stop you catching something nasty
    Answer: C

    Question 5.12
    If you have been handling lead, how is it most likely toget into your blood stream?
    A: By not wearing safety goggles
    B: By not reporting the matter to the HSE
    C: By not using the correct safety footwear
    D: By not washing your hands before eating
    Answer: D The route into the body is ingestion, normally from lead contamination on the hands.
    Question 5.13
    The number of toilets provided on site depends on:
    A: The type of work being completed
    B: The ratio of male and female workers on site
    C: The duration of the work on site
    D: The number of personnel on site
    Answer: D Guidance on the provision of welfare facilities is given in HSE publication ‘Health and Safety in Construction‘.
    Question 5.14
    Which of the following is not required to be provided under the Construction regulations?
    A: Toilet Facilities
    B: Washing Facilities
    C: Hot Food
    D: Drinking Water
    Answer: C Guidance on the provision of welfare facilities is given in HSE publication ‘Health and Safety in Construction‘.
    Question 5.15
    The extended use of powered hand-held tools and equipment may lead to which medical condition?
    A: Vibration white finger
    B: Weil’s disease
    C: Asbestosis
    D: Dermatitis
    Answer: A Hand-arm vibration can cause a range of conditions(including vibration white finger) collectively known as
    hand-arm vibration syndrome, as well as diseases such as carpal tunnel syndrome .
    Question 5.16
    What must your employer do if the daily personal noise exposure is at or exceeds 85 dB(A)?
    A: Provide hearing protection to those employees who ask for it
    B: Issue hearing protection to those exposed and ensure that it is worn
    C: Tell employees to buy their own hearing protection
    D: Report it to the Health and Safety Executive
    Answer: B This is an interim measure under the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 when the daily personal noise exposure is at or exceeds the upper exposure action value of 85 dB(A). Exposure should subsequently be reduced by implementing organizational or technical measures.
    Question 5.17
    What are the lower and upper action values with regard to daily personal noise exposure, as defined in the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005?
    A: 85 dB(A) and 90 dB(A)
    B: 80 dB(A) and 85 dB(A)
    C: 70 dB(A) and 80 dB(A)
    D: 75 dB(A) and 85 dB(A)
    Answer: B Daily personal noise exposure is the average noise level experienced by an individual over an 8 hour period.
    Question 5.18
    At or above what level of daily personal noise exposure does an employer have to provide hearing protection if it is requested by an employee?
    A: 90 dB(A)
    B: 95 dB(A)
    C: 80 dB(A)
    D: 85 dB(A)
    Answer: C This is one of the duties of employers under the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 when the lower exposure action value of 80 dB(A) is reached or exceeded.
    Question 5.19
    The effects of damage to your hearing by long-term exposure to high noise levels:
    A: can be corrected by an operation
    B: are permanent
    C: will be reduced when you change jobs
    D: can be reversed to near normal, with time
    Answer: B Hearing damage due to long-term noise exposure is irreversible.
    Question 5.20
    Hearing protection should be worn:
    A: in designated areas
    B: in noisy internal areas only
    C: at any workplace
    D: only on building sites
    Answer: A Employees must wear hearing protectors when exposed at or above the upper exposure action values and within hearing protection zones.
    Question 5.21
    Wearing suitable hearing protection:
    A: stops you hearing distracting conversations
    B: stops you hearing all noise
    C: brings noise down to an acceptable level
    D: repairs damaged hearing
    Answer: C Hearing protection still allows some noise to reach the ear, but, if it has been correctly chosen, will reduce noise levels to an acceptable level.
    Question 5.22
    Which of the following is one of the recommended means of protecting your hearing?
    A: Rolled tissue paper
    B: Cotton wool pads
    C: Soft cloth pads
    D: Ear defenders
    Answer: D The others are not considered to be suitable types of hearing protection.

    Question 5.23
    Which of the following would not reduce the risks from hand-arm vibration when using a hammer-action tool?
    A: Selecting the lowest vibration tool that is suitable and which can do the work efficiently
    B: Wearing gloves to keep the hands warm
    C Working as a team to share the work out
    D: Making sure one person does all the work with the tool
    Answer: D Where tools require constant or frequent use, rotas will avoid individuals having long exposure to vibration.
    Question 5.24
    Which of the following animals can carry Weil’s disease?
    A: Snake
    B: Sheep
    C: Rat
    D: Pig
    Answer: C Weil’s disease is a serious and sometimes fatal infection that can be transmitted to humans by contact with infected rats. Another form of Leptospirosis infection can be transmitted from cattle to humans.
    Question 5.25
    You are most likely to catch Weil’s disease (Leptospirosis) if you:
    A: Work near wet ground, waterways or sewers
    B: Work near air conditioning units
    C: Fix showers or baths
    D: Drink water from a standpipe
    Answer: A Anyone who is exposed to rat urine is at risk, particularly sewer workers and farmers. Those in contact with canal or river water are also at risk.
    Question 5.26
    What should you do if the toilets on your site are continually dirty?
    A: Ignore the problem – its normal on a construction site
    B: Make sure you tell someone who can sort it out
    C: Find some cleaning materials and clean it up yourself
    D: Ask in a nearby café or pub if you can use their toilets
    Answer: B How often welfare facilities on site require cleaning will depend on the number of people on site and how quickly they get dirty. The person in control of the site should make sure someone is responsible for keeping the facilities clean and tidy.
    Question 5.27
    Excessive sunlight on bare skin can cause which serious health problem?
    A: Dermatitis
    B: Rickets
    C: Acne
    D: Skin cancer
    Answer: D Ultraviolet rays in sunlight can cause sunburn and premature ageing of the skin. The most serious effect, however, is an increased chance of developing skin cancer.
    Last edited by amberleaf; 29-07-2009 at 11:25 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  16. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (21-11-2010), skamuk (31-03-2013)

  17. #8
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: ***Useful Information for Apprentices***

    “ First Aid After Electric Shock “
    Currents of the order of 15 mA at mains frequency passing through the body cause muscular contractions that make it difficult for a person to let go. Currents around 100 mA cause irregular contractions of the heart which are likely to prove fatal :
    Do not touch the casualty until the current is switched off. If the current cannot be switched off, stand on some dry insulating material and use a wooden or plastic implement to free the casualty from the electrical source. If breathing has stopped, start mouth-to-mouth respiration and continue until the casualty starts to breathe or until medical help arrives.
    “ Mouth-to-Mouth Respiration “
    • Lie the casualty flat if possible.
    • Ensure no obstructions are present in the mouth ( remove dentures, etc.).
    • Ease constriction at the neck, chest and waist.
    • Place a rolled jacket or pad under the shoulders to arch the neck.
    • Pinch the casualty’s nostrils and draw the chin forward to open the mouth.
    • Take a moderately deep breath and breathe steadily into the casualty’s mouth (chest will rise).
    • Lift your own head and allow the casualty to exhale (see chest deflate).
    • Repeat this cycle at a rate of 6 to 8 per minute.
    • Continue until the casualty resumes breathing unaided or until qualified medical services take over, however long this takes.
    • If breathing resumes, place casualty in the Open Airway (Recovery) Position and treat as an unconscious casualty.
    • Check the casualty for secondary injuries caused by falling or being thrown by the shock.
    Emergency Resuscitation : wherever there is a foreseeable risk of an accident resulting in an unconscious casualty due to electric shock.
    “ Open Airway (Recovery) Position “ Open Airway (Recovery) Position :
    Electrical burns even from minor shocks which may leave only superficial signs of damage, are often deep-seated in the tissue below the skin. Electrical burns should always be examined by a doctor.

  18. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (21-11-2010)

  19. #9
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: ***Useful Information for Apprentices***

    HSE information sheet :

    Carrying out a risk assessment
    To help you identify the precautions that are necessary to carry out electrical testing work safely, you need to do an assessment of the risk of injury posed by the work being done. When assessing the risk, you need to think about the hazards that are present; who may be harmed and how; and the effectiveness of existing precautions. Bear in mind the examples of factors given in this
    guidance which might increase the risk of injury.
    When carrying out a risk assessment for electrical testing, ask yourself the following questions:
    (a) Can the work be done with the equipment dead ?
    (b) Is it absolutely necessary for someone to be working on or near equipment that is live at
    dangerous voltages or current levels ?
    (c) Have suitable precautions been taken to avoid danger and, where necessary, prevent injury ?
    (d) Is the person doing the work competent for that type of work, or if not, adequately supervised ?

    * The person carrying out the testing should have received adequate training and, if appropriate, be
    competent to make an on-site risk assessment. This should take account of the ability of those employed by the customer to heed any warnings that might be given, be given,
    in order to prevent unauthorised people from approaching the unit under test.

    * Test equipment, leads and cables should be handled carefully to avoid injury. The following precautions are recommended:
    (a) All leads and cables which can be energised at dangerous voltages should be robustly insulated
    and properly terminated. All connections of conductors which can be energised at dangerous
    voltage, should be electrically and mechanically robust to prevent conductors becoming
    accidentally exposed. There should be no exposed conductors at dangerous voltages at any purpose built
    connectors or jigs into which the product is fixed for testing;
    (b) Test equipment connecting leads, probes and connectors should be sufficiently protected to
    prevent accidental contact when being applied to and removed from live parts;
    (c) Where practicable, place the equipment under test into interlocked enclosures. This allows
    connections to be made while the equipment is isolated;
    (d) Where practicable, apply test leads while the equipment is isolated and then energise it. To
    make sure that the equipment is isolated, a suitable isolating device should be used which must be:
    (i) appropriate and convenient for the intended use;
    (ii) suitably located;
    (iii) readily identifiable (eg by durable marking) as to which circuits or part of the test area is served;
    (iv) provided with adequate means to prevent the supply isolator being switched on (either inadvertently, mistakenly, or by an unauthorised person).
    What are the legal requirements?
    The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 are the principal legislation relating to electrical testing activities
    and regulation 14 is particularly relevant to live testing activities. In addition, employers are required under
    regulation 3 of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 to assess the risks to the health and safety of their employees while they are at work, in order to identify and implement the necessary precautions to ensure safety.

    (e) Where practicable, the power supplies to the unit under test and to the mains-powered
    instrumentation should include a residual current device (RCD) used as supplementary protection.
    For personal protection it is recommended that the rated tripping current of the RCD should be no
    more than 30mA (milliamps).

    Precautions :
    Where possible, the work should be done with the equipment dead (this is a requirement of the Electricity
    at Work Regulations 19892). Otherwise, adequate precautions, which should be identified in your risk
    assessment, must be taken to ensure safety. NB:

  20. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (21-11-2010)

  21. #10
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: ***Useful Information for Apprentices***

    Health & Safety Policy Document :
    What is a health and safety policy statement ?
    Your health and safety policy statement sets out how you manage health and safety in your
    organisation. It is a unique document that shows who does what; and when and how they do it.
    This is an example of a policy statement that H o w e v e r, you do not have to use this document
    or format. You are free to re c o rd and store the i n f o rmation in any form you choose. This form a t
    gives you an idea of the kind of information you need to re c o rd .
    Why do I need a health and safety policy statement ?
    The health and safety policy statement is your starting point to managing health and safety in
    the workplace. By law, (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 section 2(3)) if you employ
    five or more people you must have a written health and safety policy. This contains your
    statement of general policy on health and safety at work and the organisation and arrangements for putting that policy into practice.
    Writing a health and safety policy statement is m o re than just a legal re q u i rement – it is your
    commitment to planning and managing health and safety. It is the key to achieving acceptable
    s t a n d a rds, reducing accidents and cases of work related ill health and it shows your employees
    that you care for their health and safety.
    Who should do what ?
    With very few exceptions, the responsibility for health and safety rests on you as an employer.
    However, many day-to-day tasks may be delegated. Your statement should show clearly how these tasks are allocated, but remember,
    you will still have ultimate responsibility. You should consult your employees (through safety representatives, if you have any) about
    the policy statement. Everyone should be able to see from the policy statement exactly who is responsible for different things, such as advice,
    reporting an accident, and first aid.
    When and how should they do it ?
    Your policy statement should describe your arrangements, i.e. the systems and procedures
    you have in place for ensuring employees’ health and safety. You may wish to refer to other documents,
    eg works’ rules, safety checklists, training programmes, emergency instructions, etc. All employees may not need to see all the
    other documents, but they must see the policy statement itself.
    How often do I need to revise the policy statement ?
    It should be reviewed and possibly revised in the light of experience, or because of operational or
    organisational changes. It is useful to review the policy regularly (e.g. annually).
    Do I have to do anything else ?
    Yes, you have other legal duties under other legislation. In particular, under the Management
    of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, you have to assess the risks arising from your work activities and record the significant findings
    You also have to record your arrangements for health and safety (you can use this document to do that). Depending on your type of work, there may be other specific legislation that will apply. REMEMBER: What you write in the policy
    has to be put into practice. The true test of a health and safety policy is the actual conditions in the workplace, not how well
    the statement is written.
    How to use this guidance :
    This guidance is split into three parts. It contains a statement of general policy based on your legal duties under the Health and Safety at Work etc
    Act 1974. Then you can re c o rd your org a n i s a t i o n a l responsibilities and your arrangements to ensure
    the health and safety of your employees.

    Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 :

    This is the Health and Safety Policy Statement of
    Our statement of general policy is:
    * to provide adequate control of the health and safety risks arising from our work activities;
    * to consult with our employees on matters affecting their health and safety;
    * to provide and maintain safe plant and equipment;
    * to ensure safe handling and use of substances;
    * to provide information, instruction and supervision for employees;
    * to ensure all employees are competent to do their tasks, and to give them adequate training;
    * to prevent accidents and cases of work-related ill health;
    * to maintain safe and healthy working conditions; and
    * to review and revise this policy as necessary at regular intervals.
    Signed (Employer) : Date Review : date

    Responsibilities :

    1 Overall and final responsibility for health and safety is that of
    Note 1 : Your name must be insert e d h e re. As the employer (i.e. sole t r a d e r, senior partner or managing director) you have overall responsibility for health and safety
    2 Day-to-day responsibility for ensuring this policy is put into practice is delegated to
    Note 2 : If you are not always there, or do not have time to manage on
    a day-to-day basis, you can delegate this role to someone else, e.g. dire c t o r, manager or
    supervisor. You will need to e n s u re that they keep you fully informed of health and safety
    matters – it will still be your overall responsibility y.
    3 To ensure health and safety standards are maintained/ i m p roved, the following people have responsibility in
    the following are as
    Note 3 : You may delegate functions to people within your org a n i s a t i o n ,
    either by specific areas within the workplace or by topic. You should include their specific
    responsibilities in their job responsibilities in their job description (if they have one). You must also ensure that they
    a re competent to undertake their health and safety responsibilities and have adequate resources to enable
    them to do their job properly. It is important that responsibilities are clearly set out – this will make sure that if
    t h e re are any health and safety concerns, they can be reported to the right person, so they can be dealt with.
    You may wish to insert a diagram or chart showing your management structure / arrangements .
    Name Responsibility
    4 All employees have to: l co-operate with supervisors and managers on

    * co-operate with supervisors and managers on
    health and safety matters;
    *not interfere with anything provided to safeguard
    their health and safety;
    * take reasonable care of their own health and safety; and
    * report all health and safety concerns to an appropriate person (as detailed in this policy statement).
    Note 4 : Employees have legal responsibilities to take care of
    the health and safety of themselves and others, and to co-operate with you to help you comply with the law.
    E q u a l l y, if employees have any concerns over health and safety issues, they should be
    clear about whom they should tell, so that the concerns can be addressed .
    Last edited by amberleaf; 15-08-2009 at 12:15 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  22. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), Brightspark9 (17-08-2011), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (21-11-2010)

  23. #11
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: ***Useful Information for Apprentices***

    The new Health and Safety (Offences) Act 2008
    January 2009 saw one of the most significant changes to UK law for electrical duty holders coming into force, placing them firmly in the firing line in the event of health and safety breaches. The implications of the Health and Safety (Offences) Act 2008 are severe for those in the industry, below we examine how you can reduce risk for yourself at a time when many companies are searching for ways to trim budgets.
    What is it?
    New legislation came into force on 16th January 2009 that has increased the penalties and provided courts with greater sentencing powers for individuals and dutyholders (that is, employees & employers) who breach health and safety laws. More specifically in the case of electrical legislation, non compliance with 'The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989'. The Act amends Section 33 of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, and raises the maximum penalties available to the courts in respect of certain health and safety offences.
    The maximum Magistrates' court fine for most safety breaches has risen from £5,000 to £20,000. It is now also possible to jail offenders for up to 12 months for more offences than ever before.
    Why has it been introduced?
    It is generally accepted that the level of punishment for some health and safety offences does not fit the crime. These changes will ensure that sentences can now be more easily set at a level to deter businesses that do not take their health and safety management responsibilities seriously and further encourage employers and employees to comply with the law. HSE enforcement policy is to:
    "target those who cut corners, gain commercial advantage over competitors by failing to comply with health and safety law and who put workers and the public at risk.
    Around 1,000 electrical accidents are reported to the HSE every year.
    The Act aims to free-up the legal system by giving Magistrates the power to appropriately handle the more serious health and safety breaches. Previously it would have been costly to take these cases to the Crown Court and in many instances the plaintiff would settle with the minimal Magistrates fines.
    The reduction in costs for plaintiffs in a Magistrates Court may mean that we witness a rise in the number of prosecutions so firms should be extra vigilant when it comes to their health and safety policies.
    Will it affect me as an individual?
    If, even as an employee, you are responsible for electrical safety and breach the law by not providing a safe working electrical environment, then in the eyes of the law you are most certainly culpable and therefore exposed to the penalties listed below.
    How easy will it be to implement?
    More cases will be resolved in the lower courts and justice will be faster, less costly and more efficient. Jail sentences for particularly blameworthy health and safety offences committed by individuals, can now be imposed reflecting the severity of such crimes, whereas there were more limited options in the past.
    What are the penalties?
    • The maximum fine which may be imposed in the lower courts is £20,000 for most health and safety offences. There are unlimited fines in the higher courts.
    • Imprisonment is an option for individuals prosecuted for health and safety offences in both the lower and higher courts - up to 12 months in a Magistrates Court and 2 years in a Crown Court.
    • Certain offences, which are currently triable only in the lower courts, will be triable in either the lower or higher courts.
    What action can I take in order to defend myself?
    Compliance with Health & Safety Laws, i.e. The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989, will go a long away to ensure you do not commit an offence under the new Act. More specifically:
    • Documented evidence of a well maintained electrical system, i.e. inspect & Test Records, Electrical Drawings.
    • Competent workforce. That is, appropriately experienced and trained personnel kept abreast of current electrical standards (17th Edition).
    • Safe working procedures which are both current and clearly documented.
    Remember
    Good employers, good managers and responsible employees with documented evidence of electrical compliance have nothing to fear.

  24. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (21-11-2010)

  25. #12
    Electricians Forums 'Stig'


    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Blackburn
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 1,593 Times
    in 1,199 Posts

    Default Re: ***Useful Information for Apprentices***

    The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989


    The Secretary of State, in exercise of the powers conferred on him by sections 15(1), (2), (3)(a) and (b), (4)(a), (5)(b), (6)(b), (8) and (9) and 82(3)(a) of, and paragraphs 1(1)(a) and (c), (2) and (3), 6(2), 9, 11, 12, 14, 15(1), 16 and 21(b) of Schedule 3 to, the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974[1] ("the 1974 Act"), and of all other powers enabling him in that behalf and for the purpose of giving effect without modifications to proposals submitted to him by the Health and Safety Commission under section 11(2)(d) of the 1974 Act, after the carrying out by the said Commission of consultations in accordance with section 50(3) of that Act, hereby makes the following Regulations:

    PART I : INTRODUCTION

    Citation and commencement
    1. These Regulations may be cited as the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 and shall come into force on 1st April 1990.
    Interpretation
    2.—(1) In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires-
    "approved" means approved in writing for the time being by the Health and Safety Executive for the purposes of these Regulations or conforming with a specification approved in writing by the Health and Safety Executive for the purposes of these Regulations;
    "circuit conductor" means any conductor in a system which is intended to carry electric current in normal conditions, or to be energised in normal conditions, and includes a combined neutral and earth conductor, but does not include a conductor provided solely to perform a protective function by connection to earth or other reference point;
    "conductor" means a conductor of electrical energy;
    "danger" means risk of injury;
    "electrical equipment" includes anything used, intended to be used or installed for use, to generate, provide, transmit, transform, rectify, convert, conduct, distribute, control, store, measure or use electrical energy;
    "firedamp" means any flammable gas or any flammable mixture of gases occurring naturally in a mine;
    "injury" means death or personal injury from electric shock, electric burn, electrical explosion or arcing, or from fire or explosion initiated by electrical energy, where any such death or injury is associated with the generation, provision, transmission, transformation, rectification, conversion, conduction, distribution, control, storage, measurement or use of electrical energy;
    "safety-lamp mine" means-
    (a) any coal mine; or
    (b) any other mine in which-
    (i) there has occurred below ground an ignition of firedamp; or
    (ii) more than 0.25% by volume of firedamp is found on any occasion at any place below ground in the mine;
    "system" means an electrical system in which all the electrical equipment is, or may be, electrically connected to a common source of electrical energy, and includes such source and such equipment.
    (2) Unless the context otherwise requires, any reference in these Regulations to-
    (a) a numbered regulation or Schedule is a reference to the regulation or Schedule in these Regulations so numbered;
    (b) a numbered paragraph is a reference to the paragraph so numbered in the regulation or Schedule in which the reference appears.

    Persons on whom duties are imposed by these Regulations
    3.—(1) Except where otherwise expressly provided in these Regulations, it shall be the duty of every-
    (a) employer and self-employed person to comply with the provisions of these Regulations in so far as they relate to matters which are within his control; and
    (b) manager of a mine or quarry (within in either case the meaning of section 180 of the Mines and Quarries Act 1954[2]) to ensure that all requirements or prohibitions imposed by or under these Regulations are complied with in so far as they relate to the mine or quarry or part of a quarry of which he is the manager and to matters which are within his control.

    (2) It shall be the duty of every employee while at work-
    (a) to co-operate with his employer so far as is necessary to enable any duty placed on that employer by the provisions of these Regulations to be complied with; and
    (b) to comply with the provisions of these Regulations in so far as they relate to matters which are within his control.

  26. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to amberleaf For This Useful Post:

    AJD (18-06-2012), kowalski (09-03-2011), manda (21-11-2010)

Page 1 of 24 1234511 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Apprentices
    By ChrisElectrical88 in forum Electrical Forum: General Electrical Forum
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 14-07-2013, 10:24 PM
  2. apprentices
    By RyanCheetham in forum Electrical Forum: General Electrical Forum
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 23-05-2013, 10:36 PM
  3. Apprentices
    By gazzamikes in forum Business Related
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 12-05-2012, 01:28 PM
  4. ***Cont../ Useful Information for Electricians & Apprentices***
    By amberleaf in forum Electrical Forum: General Electrical Forum
    Replies: 931
    Last Post: 22-04-2012, 11:07 AM
  5. Apprentices - Do you or don't you?
    By millwall ken in forum Electrical Forum: General Electrical Forum
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 28-12-2010, 09:38 PM

Visitors found this page by searching for:

content

does the white earth wire on a rcbo and the load earth wire conect to the same point in a ccu

eighteen identical christmas tree lights are connected in series and to a 120v source. the string dissipates 64w

if R1 and R2 are connected in series and R3 in parallel. if R1 =3 R2=5 R3=25 find the total current I1 I2 and I3

a coil of wire passes a current of 55A when connected to a 120v d.c. supply but only 24.5A when connected to a 110v a.c. supply.calculate the resistance of the coil

Tags for this Thread


If you like our electrical forum, then perhaps checkout our Tiling Forum or even our professional and DIY Plumbing Forum.
Tens of thousands of tradesmen and over 2 million combined posts.


Electricians Forums is a Trading Style of Untold Developments Ltd. Search Engine Optimisation, Web Development and Online Marketing for the UK.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35