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Discuss Identifying single core cpc's and neutrals in the Industrial Electrician Talk area at ElectriciansForums.co.uk.

  1. moosey86

    moosey86 Regular EF Member

    Just wondering if anyone has any handy tips when trying to identify single core cpc's and neutrals?

    I work in a few food factories than are in constant production and switching off supplies is not an option, so identifying circuits can get pretty tricky.

    Identifying neutrals is pretty simple as long as the neutral hasn't been stolen for another circuit (which I do come across a lot at one place) because clamping the live conductor and the neutral at the board should read the same amount of current being drawn (assuming it's single phase).

    But cpc's are near on impossible. I'm going to get a socket and see or martindale fuse finder which would help for finding where things are fed from, but could these bits of kit be manipulated to trace back through the neutrals and cpc's? I'm guessing they can't but hoping they can!

    If anyone could shed some light on any slick techniques that would help me with my problem it'd be much appreciated.

    Moosey
     
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  3. Richard Burns

    Richard Burns Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Business Name:
    Richard Burns
    If you put a tone generator on the cpc as close as possible to the point you wish to identify then you may be able to track it to the point you need, the problem with old and extended circuits is that the cpcs could well be interlinked and the further away you are forma point the more unreliable it will be.
    I am not sure if fuse finders generate a tone on the cpc (should be OK with the neutral) however I would expect that identification in a DB would be impossible still as they are all linked there.
     
  4. westward10

    westward10 Electrician's Arms

    Top Poster Of Month

    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    Further complicated by steel containment if installed in such a way.
     
  5. telectrix

    telectrix Appreciated Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    cheshire/staffordshire
    Business Name:
    Telectrix
    if you wanted it easy, you;d have been a plumber. :(
     
    richy3333 likes this.
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  7. moosey86

    moosey86 Regular EF Member

    I thought this would be the response, I've tried to think of numerous ways to identify without physically tracing. They're all the original circuits right at the bottom of the trunking and they're quite far away so it's not something that's feasible really.

    I'll just identify the neutrals and then I'll just get the lad to measure voltage from phase to earth as I individually take out the cpc's.... I've got to be pretty unlucky for a fault to occur whilst doing so....unless it's my lad :tearsofjoy:

    It's only lighting circuits he'll live!
     
  8. westward10

    westward10 Electrician's Arms

    Top Poster Of Month

    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    That really isn't the wisest of ideas in fact it is a ridiculous idea.
     
    Andy78 likes this.
  9. Pete999

    Pete999 Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Northampton
    What a ridiculous suggestion
     
  10. Lucien Nunes

    Lucien Nunes Mercury Arc Rectifier Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    London
    It's technically possible. A method I have used to trace individual conductors that are paralleled up with low impedance containment was to inject a current with a split-core CT or demo transformer. Nothing needs to be disconnected and it doesn't matter how much metal is in parallel - that merely forms the return leg of the injection circuit. Assemble the transformer around one core at one end and crank up the input on a variac or labpack some known current is flowing which you can monitor with the primary current. Then pick through the options at the far end until you find a core with the same or similar current, and turn off the injection transformer to prove. If there's no parallel path you would need to run out a wander lead for your return. If there are branches then the injection current will be found in more than one place at the clamp meter end and this can help locate them.
     
    HandySparks and 1Justin like this.
  11. moosey86

    moosey86 Regular EF Member

    What about that suggestion do you find ridiculous? Are you talking on a safety point of view or a practical view?

    Cheers pal I haven't read through that properly to get my head round it yet but I will do and hopefully it'll be the answer
     
  12. westward10

    westward10 Electrician's Arms

    Top Poster Of Month

    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    Don't really know what to say to that, are you a qualified electrician, I have to ask.
     
  13. moosey86

    moosey86 Regular EF Member

    That is a typical hardcore forum member response, I hope you are proud of yourself for your attempt at belittling someone.

    But I do know what you can say to it...you can answer my question if that's not too much bother for you?

    I will answer yours....yes I am a fully qualified electrician.
     
  14. westward10

    westward10 Electrician's Arms

    Top Poster Of Month

    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    I make no attempt to belittle anyone. If you feel removing the cpc and possibly the circuits mean of fault protection whilst putting the "lads" life at risk is a sensible option, fill out your risk assessment. We all make choices, some we live to regret while others suffer the consequences.
     
    Hellmooth likes this.
  15. moosey86

    moosey86 Regular EF Member

    I wouldn't say it would be putting the lads life at risk, we work near live circuits all day long it's just one of those environments.

    We can make it as safe as possible when doing it and we will identify what we require in very little time resulting in a good job well done at the end of it.

    Like you say though everyone has to make choices, I don't think many have died from a single phase 10A circuit that they know is about to have the cpc removed, so what you're getting at I feel is a stretch too far in my opinion.
     
  16. westward10

    westward10 Electrician's Arms

    Top Poster Of Month

    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    Your last statement says a lot about your understanding of electric shock. I will leave you to it.
     
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