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Discuss Career Change - What would you do in my shoes... in the Electrical Courses & Electrical NVQ's area at ElectrciansForums.co.uk.

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  1. Frank_620
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    Frank_620 EF Member

    Location:
    Stratford
    Hi Guys,

    I've done a lot of reading here and elsewhere and am 90% sure of what i am going to do but would like some options from people in the know/that have done it.

    Background: I have been a physics teacher for 9 years but have always wanted a practical trade based job. I am quite confident with most diy things and have decided i really want a change and electrician is the way i want to go.

    At the age of 30, my options are limited. My current thinking is to do the NVQ level 3 course with Option Skills. It is expensive at 6.5k but it can be done over 8 weeks. I then figured i could get a job as an electricians mate and slowly gain experience etc and be given more responsibility.

    I get paid full time from teaching in August so that would cover 4 of my 8 weeks on the course.

    The other option is trying to get a job as an electricians mate straight away and work up to doing a course but i have a family and so weekends/evenings are precious.

    I guess my main question is it it difficult to get a job working with another electrician once i have my qualifications and is this the route you would take?

    Thanks in advance,
    Frank
     
  2. Pete999
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    Pete999 Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Northampton
    Business Name:
    None
    Welcome Frank, I've got to ask though, why do you want to leave teaching, it's not a bad career is it? are are you finding Teaching unrewarding, if you take this route of a career change, it wont be an easy transition, not just because of your previous role, but for anyone who, hasn't worked with their hands, although you did mention you have some good DIY skill. Any how good luck with your career change hope it all goes as planned.
     
  3. telectrix
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    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

    Top Poster Of Month

    Location:
    cheshire/staffordshire
    Business Name:
    Telectrix
    i had the chance to train as a teacher way back. if i'd gone for it, I'd now be drawing in a £1500+/month pension instead of the pittance I get from state pension, having been self-employed for 40 years, paying tax on everything. now 71 and have to keep working to survive.
     
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  4. littlespark
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    littlespark Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Scottish Borders
    I would have loved to be a teacher except for two things.

    The kids, and their parents.
     
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  5. telectrix
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    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

    Top Poster Of Month

    Location:
    cheshire/staffordshire
    Business Name:
    Telectrix
    teaching at college could be a way out of that.
     
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  6. Pete999
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    Pete999 Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Northampton
    Business Name:
    None
    I had a chance to teach at RAF Cardington once, but didn't really fancy it, good job I didn't really, would never have had the travel chances I got later on in my career.
     
  7. Gavin John Hyde
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    Gavin John Hyde Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Somerset
    Business Name:
    Sulis Electrical Services Ltd
    if you dont mind me asking if teaching physics I assume you have a science degree of some sort? possibly even in Physics? in which case you can earn an awful lot more using your degree than you would likely earn as an electrician... i fully expect teaching pays a lot more than the average electrical job.
    industry and a lot of companies are crying out for scientists and engineers.. physics includes a lot of maths.. again very sought after by big firms...
    If you are keen to change career.. how about working in the city in finance... science/physics/maths all very analytical and have met plenty of people using these skills in london and to put it bluntly.. after 2 years were literally rolling in cash! one retired at age 40 and lives a live of luxury....
    There are many many better options than being a spark with a decent degree...
     
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  8. fuse
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    fuse EF Member

    Location:
    uk
    I will add to this, I went from an engineer (on the tools) position in 2002 when I could earn over 50k pretty easily with the hours available. I got a job as a tutor in a college (in 2002) paid at 31k
    This teaching lark which is easy is not the super paid job people think. I have been at college and back uni to qualify as a teacher to be able to earn what I need to. Only teachers can earn decent coin not those who are not qualified teachers. I will stress the tern QUALIFIED AND TEACHERS.
     
  9. Frank_620
    Offline

    Frank_620 EF Member

    Location:
    Stratford
    Thanks for the replies guys.

    I have a 3rd in Astrophysics with sounds good apart from the 3rd bit! I've also always known i made an error and have not really enjoyed my time as a teacher. I am a practical person at heart and have rebuilt cars, fitted bathrooms and kitchens etc and from some experience i think i will really enjoy electrics.

    Teaching pays about 32k but really you are then capped without a lot of extra work which quite frankly i don't want to do when i already work 8-5 and then 7pm-9pm most nights!


    Assuming I do want to make the change, the question i'd really like to know is is it likely i will be able to find work once i've gained this qualification or am i going about it the wrong way? This is the course: NVQ Electrical Training Course - Options Skills - Electrician, Gas & Plumbing Training - http://www.options-skills.co.uk/nvq-electrical-training-course/

    I love the idea of working for myself but am perfectly happy in knowing that this might be 3, 4, 5 years down the line once i have gained enough experience.
     
  10. Paignton pete
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    Paignton pete Regular EF Member

    Location:
    Over the rainbow
    I would say go for it. With a physics background your probably going to get the cable calcs Sussed better than a lot of experienced sparks.
    As for route to qual. I would suggest:
    Nvq level 2 and 3
    17th edition qual ( soon to be 18th)
    And a part p course if going to do domestic.
    Also
    Yes get experience as mate with a spark.
    (Getting a spark to take you on is going to be the most difficult)
    After 2 years proven experience on the tools you can get registered in your own right with a competant persons scheme.
    Total 4-5 years minimum.

    Don't go the five week wonder route. You cannot learn enough or gain enough experience that way.
     
  11. Gavin John Hyde
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    Gavin John Hyde Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Somerset
    Business Name:
    Sulis Electrical Services Ltd
    Raf Cardington.. showing your age there @Pete999@Pete999. place hasnt been used by RAF since the 70's. been used by allsorts of government agencies since for various things where space and safety are required they filmed some starwars films in the monster sized sheds/hangers. its now used for airships and some new outfit are trying to make a large airship for cross channel travel.
     
  12. Adam W
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    Adam W Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Bournemouth
    If I were in your shoes I'd probably be questioning why so many people are still wasting their time with university degrees when for an initial cash outlay they could be earning enough to support a family within 8 weeks.
     
  13. Paignton pete
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    Paignton pete Regular EF Member

    Location:
    Over the rainbow
    I have to question the 8 weeks. As I stated in above post really not enough time to gain enough knowledge or experience.
     
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  14. Frank_620
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    Frank_620 EF Member

    Location:
    Stratford
    Unsure if you are being sarcastic but being from an education background i can answer that one a bit:

    Even now the general line from schools is if you can, go to uni. If your not good enough, get an apprenticeship. It's so backward but is slowly changing.

    I wish i'd have known my options and appreciated my choices but i didn't and now is my chance to change before it's too late. I have friends from various backgrounds/jobs etc and it's very interesting comparing those that have spent 25k on uni fees and those that didnt. I'd say only about 20% of the uni goers earn substantially more than the others.
     
  15. Frank_620
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    Frank_620 EF Member

    Location:
    Stratford
    Agreed. But do you think it's an advantage to have passed the qualifications and then work as an electricians mate and gain experience that way around?

    As opposed to working for an electrician and then eventually doing the course once i have hands on experience.
     
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