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  1. Leesparkykent
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    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
  2. Richard Burns
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    Richard Burns Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Business Name:
    Richard Burns
    Does it really glide past obstructions?
    How many ultra flat undersurfaces do you pull cables through?
    Just use two strong magnets with holes in and a bit of string!
     
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  3. bigspark17
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    bigspark17 Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    wales
    I had one tried it once i think.. Looks great in that clip but how many houses are build without a joist under the bottom of socket.?? Customers see a video like this and will expect us to rewire without lifting floors or carpets :/
     
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  4. 123
    Online

    123 Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    East Antrim
    That looks class, if it could perform like in the video it would be a useful addition. I fear though that after being nice and careful when you get to the end of the run nothing will be there on the other end, several failed attempts later and back to lifting the floor and using rods.

    Also no doubt as it's strong magnets all sorts of swarf and crap will end up stuck to it!
     
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  5. Barry White
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    Barry White Guest

    I have 2 super strong magnets that work like that through a kitchen worktop not convinced they would work under floors tho.
    123 has a point too the vid showed copper pipes but how many old houses have steel conduit and other crap.
    I supose it depends on price if its cheap enough to lose then its worth a try.
     
  6. 123
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    123 Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    East Antrim
  7. UNG
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    UNG Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Nr Wigan, Lancs
    I've got one and it has it's uses and it's limitations not to bad if you have standard 18mm floorboards and relatively thin floor coverings but it struggles if you have a floor covered with laminate or engineered wood
    I have not used it where there are any obstructions as shown in the demo so not sure how good it is if you get any real obstructions on site but any floor coverings would certainly reduce it's effectiveness to negotiate them
    IMO a useful tool to have if you can work with it's limitations
     
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  8. GETWIRED
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    GETWIRED Regular EF Member

    Location:
    Manchester
    Crap really... Suppose its handy to have, its saved me alot of time on 3 occasions so has paid for itself but apart from that. Can be a pain the harris when trying to run it long distances through subfloor.
     
  9. Aindowsimon
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    Aindowsimon Regular EF Member

    Location:
    Caernarfon
    I used it across ceilings using tiny bit of tissue between magnet and ceiling . Saves marking ceiling

    Certantly has its limitations but it's something that can get you out of a pinch , I sometimes use it in conjunction to my 3meter long steel chain £3 from b&q
     
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  10. Gavin John Hyde
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    Gavin John Hyde Regular EF Member

    Location:
    Somerset
    Business Name:
    Sulis Electrical Services
    They are useful when moving cables in partition walls but of limited use when dealing with the odd noggin or bit of seemingly random timber in the wall that causes an obstruction, so you need to be confident of a flush surface to move the cable against. they can be useful to move a fed cable attached to rods the last little bit to a access hole.
    You can make your own version by buying some rare earth magnets online ( the ones with hole in middle- bit like washers) then bolt onto a plastic plaster trowel. you cna cover with piece of cloth if needed and there you have it
    feed the cable into wall with something magnetic on end and magnet will pull it through to where you want it.
     
  11. SWD
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    SWD Gender neutral Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    London
    I used to use a dwarf to crawl under the floorboards but lost him in a house in Wandsworth in about 1987.
     
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  12. Strima
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    Strima Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    St Neots
    Apparently the banging and muffled screams stopped after a couple of days...
     
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  13. SWD
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    SWD Gender neutral Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    London
    I usually find that these new fangled tools that are meant to make our life easier are usually a waste of money, try running cables in a 1900's house, wood lathe plaster walls with most of the lathe at the bottom where its all crumbled away, 7 0r 9 inch skirting boards and suspended floors on brick pillars with a load of joists, noggins and supports as well as the rubble the original builder dumped under the floor as well as the old conduit and even sometimes to old pipes for the gas lighting.

    It must be an American invention.............

    I'll just stick with a hammer a bolster a skill saw as well as a length of trunking lid.

    Maybe I should patent and sell my tool for knocking a channel out behind skirting boards, hmmmmmm
     
  14. stummish
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    stummish Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    leeds
    The best review I saw of it was by the superrod rep in cef. On their test bed, which is a little biased to be an easy version of a real house, it basically failed every obstacle. Even the rep was embarrassed enough by then end of the demo, I felt bad for him, it made him look a fool!

    Stick to their rods and cavity kit, they are the dogs dangly bits.
     
  15. Andy78
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    Andy78 Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kingston upon Hull
    As soon as I saw the video demonstration with the pipes that was me disinterested. Most pipes I come across are not tight to the board above. The potential is there for the "puck" to get stuck, or slip between pipes and board meaning that your cable could end up laid over an uninsulated hot pipe.
     

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