Posting a message to the forum will remove the above advertisement
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. angel While you're here, would you mind checking out our Electrician's Insurance section to see if we could save you a few quid? - Specifically our Van Insurance Deals and Public Liability Insurance Deals. Thanks for supporting the forum! angel

    5% Discount from Electrical2Go.co.uk for ALL members! - Click Here

  3. Forum for Trainees.

    If you are a trainee and haven’t already applied to join our trainee forum then click HERE The trainee forum is a closed area of the forum where the Forum Mentors will freely share their vast experience within the industry. 

    Dismiss Notice

Discuss Lots of Dado trunking in the Electrical Tools and Products area at ElectrciansForums.co.uk.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Please make sure you checkout our forum sponsors, many do discounts for members and, they keep the forum free to use.
  1. WaterSparky
    Offline

    WaterSparky Regular EF Member

    Location:
    My house
    We don`t usually mess around with commercial/offices. But i`ve been tasked with putting some power and data points in the office. Seems like dado trunking or the like is the best bet and lots of it...

    So I`ve heard one of the best ways is to use a mitre saw for it? But i`m worried that the course blade that is in mine will chip it, not too big of deal now as its warm, but if i`m to get my use out of it i`d like to be able to use it in the cold. I`d assume the more teeth the better?

    Anyone got any good blade recommendations?

    Regards

    WS

    Edit: Didnt look to see if there were posts about this subject... My bad.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2015
  2. darkwood
    Online

    darkwood Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

    Location:
    West Yorkshire
    I always used a set square, pen and hacksaw.. can take some getting used to as a trainee keeping the cut straight on all sides but once you master it you won't be stuck with similar tasks down the road.
     
  3. Andy78
    Offline

    Andy78 Forum Mentor

    Location:
    Kingston upon Hull
    A hacksaw blade for me too, probably 18-24tpi would be fine. Anything like a 32tpi will just bung up straight away.
    All dado trunking will come with manufactured bends available for most situations. I personally think they give the best finish to a job but they can easily bulk the cost up.
    Three compartment stuff is great but slightly longer on the install time and way more cost than single compartment with divider. You can obviously only get away with single compartment if the trunking is not going to be too heavily populated.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. gnselectricals
    Offline

    gnselectricals Electrician's Arms

    I bought myself a evolution rage sliding mitre saw for dado and had no problems with chipping etc. alternating now between dado and metal work and the blades holding up pretty well
     
  5. edexlab
    Offline

    edexlab Electrician's Arms

    A firm I worked for used a chop saw designed for wood, this was tried a few times but it could cut ok sometimes but more often it would shatter the plastic, probably due to the high Rev's possibly a slower speed would work,
    I have the smaller evolution chopsaw which is slower and great for unistrut etc but I've not tried it on plastics as it's too small a cut radius for dado trunking
    Another vote for the Hacksaw from me!
     
  6. rsgaz
    Offline

    rsgaz Regular EF Member

    Location:
    UK
    I use a jigsaw along the back of it. This means I don't need to put some offcuts of lid on the carrier beforehand like I would with a mitre saw to stop it vibrating and/or shattering.

    Gaz
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Electricians Directory Post a Domestic Job Post a Commercial Job