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Discuss Metallic pipe with push fittings in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectrciansForums.co.uk.

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  1. Virtualcom13at
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    Virtualcom13at Guest

    If a metallic pipe work has push fit type fittings that dont provide electrical continuity what should be done

    A=Leave it as it is
    B=Increase the pipe size
    C=Bridge with a brown bonding conductor
    D=Bridge with a G/Y bonding conductor

    I was thinking A ?
    Thanks

    Last one then i can get my self in the workshop and try to put into practise what i have learnt in the past two months of studying.
    just one step closer to never picking up a paint brush again.
     
  2. wirepuller
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    wirepuller Trusted Advisor

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    south uk
    There is insufficient information given to provide an answer.
     
  3. JUD
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    JUD Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    I'd go with D
     
  4. Virtualcom13at
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    Virtualcom13at Guest

    Thats word for word what the TMA question reads.

    I did wonder what material the push fittings where made from but as it says dont provide electrical continuity i guessed the fitting must be of plastic.
    I dont no maybe im talking rubbish.
     
  5. Virtualcom13at
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    Virtualcom13at Guest

    That was my second guess as if the matallic pipe did need bonding then at least its done by answer D.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 23, 2011
  6. Paul.M
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    Paul.M Trusted Advisor

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    I'd agree with Jud as well. The reason being is that any fault current finding the water pipes would not be carried away (and therefore not tripping the mcb/fuse/rcd) and not finding earth (MET) at the cu hence the need to bridge the plastic push fit. An experiment was carried out in a Chris Kitcher testing book. He had two short pieces of copper pipe with a push fit connecting them, filled the pipe with water and put 230V on one end and tested the other end. Results showed only 3mA (0.003A) was conducted through the water. Just so you know why we bridge plastic push fittings. Any more questions, I can answer these whilst Telectrix is on another thread :)
     
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    Last edited: Jun 23, 2011
  7. telectrix
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    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

    Location:
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    Telectrix
    have to agree with jud and paul m on what the answer would be, but wirepuller is correct as the question does not stipulate whether or not the pipework is extraneous. so the question as it stands is unanswerable.
     
  8. i=p/u
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    i=p/u Trusted Advisor

    id kick a fuss in the shop and say i wanted metal ones;)
     
  9. Virtualcom13at
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    Virtualcom13at Guest

    Cheers guys
    Glad i found this forum
     
  10. Virtualcom13at
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    Virtualcom13at Guest

    Thats plumbers going for the easy option. he he
     
  11. telectrix
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    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

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    Telectrix
    you won't be after a few weeks :gunsmilie:
     
  12. IQ Electrical
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    IQ Electrical Trusted Advisor

    Unless the pipe is being used AS the bonding conductor, why would you wish to assist the distribution of fault voltages onto sections of pipework which because of the high resistance of water are, in effect, isolated sections?Wirepuller is right, the question as it stands can't be answered but I'll bet Mr Kitcher isn't advocating linking across push joints on pipework that isn't being used as the actual bonding conductor.
     
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  13. Paul.M
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    Paul.M Trusted Advisor

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    I'm afraid Mr Kitcher does and has a nice photo in his book of him doing it. It's things like this that confuse people. I know there's a few mistakes in his books but these are what people use to pass tricky exams.
     
  14. Virtualcom13at
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    Virtualcom13at Guest

    Who is this mr Kitcher he sounds like a man who knows. whats his book called??? as im going to be studying this possibly for the next two years and then working and learning for the rest of my working life i might as well get more books to add to my collection.
     
  15. IQ Electrical
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    IQ Electrical Trusted Advisor

    I remember seeing the picture but again, I'm certain that this will be where the pipe IS the bonding conductor, check it out if you can Paul, I'll not be able to see the book until Monday.
     
  16. Paul.M
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    Paul.M Trusted Advisor

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    I'll dig the book out and have a look for you IQ, interested myself. Have you had a look at the op's other question on the other thread?
     
  17. IQ Electrical
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    IQ Electrical Trusted Advisor

    I think so if it's the bonding size on TN
     
  18. Paul.M
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    Paul.M Trusted Advisor

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    In Kitcher's testing book it is bridging a plastic push fit when the pipe is being used as the bonding conductor. May be that should be in the question? Otherwise do nothing. Good old C&G making things clear as mud yet again :)
     
  19. IQ Electrical
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    IQ Electrical Trusted Advisor

    Yes, that's what I thought it should be.
     
  20. Paul.M
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    Paul.M Trusted Advisor

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    So we are all wrong because it does not state in the question what the pipe work has in relation to earthing? There should be another option E= ask the plumber, its his mess ;)
     
  21. IQ Electrical
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    IQ Electrical Trusted Advisor

    Yes, plumbers know everything!If the pipe is not acting as the bonding conductor then a quick < or > 22KOhm IR test after the first joint will confirm any bonding requirements (highly unlikely).There used to be a requirement to insert an insulating joint in pipework to external taps on PME supplies, I bet a few had 'bonding links' wrongly fitted over the years!
     
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