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  1. Pell
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    Pell New EF Member

    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Hey everyone!

    I'm trying to create lighting with hanging filament LED bulbs, something similar to the image below.

    Lights 1.jpg

    For various reasons I can't buy the ceiling fittings and will have to settle for ones with UK 3 pin plugs. I've found one on ebay with the description that reads "Up to 60W bulbs, 250V, 3A"

    and was hoping to pair it (x6) with 2-4W filament LED bulbs that will all be plugged to one extension (with 6 sockets) that will then be plugged into a wall outlet.

    Will this be safe? Is there anything I should be aware off/worried about with this kind of set-up? I'm a complete noob when it comes to electricity, any help will be much appreciated!

    Cheers,
    Jacob
     
  2. dmxtothemax
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    dmxtothemax Regular EF Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Business Name:
    David Haddock Electronic Repairs
    Plugging 6 x 4w bulbs into a power board and then extension lead is safe !.
    Is it going to be a permanent fixture or just temporary ?
    Electrical code tends to frown upon using flexible cords for permanent fixtures.
    They tend to prefer proper cable.
     
  3. darkwood
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    darkwood For it is a human number, its number is 666 Staff Member Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    West Yorkshire
    ..

    Where do you get this impression, if the cables are suitable for the load and environment then they are just as good regardless of trends or rule of thumb..
     
  4. dmxtothemax
    Offline

    dmxtothemax Regular EF Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Business Name:
    David Haddock Electronic Repairs
    Response: In accordance with 1910.305(g)(1)(iii), flexible cords may not be used in permanent installations as specified in (A) through (E) below:
    (A) As a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure;
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
  5. Leesparkykent
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    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    That's a quote from OSHA...which is the occupational safety and health association in the USA.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. darkwood
    Offline

    darkwood For it is a human number, its number is 666 Staff Member Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    West Yorkshire
    @dmxtothemax@dmxtothemax

    I just realised you are not UK based, the regulations you specify are not ours as we conform to the BS7671 for which the site is based on, please note if you are given advice that you do so to the BS7671 unless it has been clearly stated it falls under other regulations for example if the OP is from a different country or they are enquiring as such.
    To my knowledge a flexible cable is not any different to a fixed cable in its insulation and sheath except for the fact that its cores are fine strand, given the regulations requires these to be terminated in a different method IE - either a ferrule or a type of connector designed for fine stranded then applying these methods means the cable can be used where fixed wiring is normally used...
    To note here that the Irony is that most people including sparkies in this country will happily lengthen a ceiling drop or wire a plug up without dressing the cables ends correctly not realising that even a plug top on a flex needs the ends crimping, very rare do I see it done and can account for many heat damaged plugs on heavier loads.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. dmxtothemax
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    dmxtothemax Regular EF Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Business Name:
    David Haddock Electronic Repairs
    It's code in Australia , it's code in USA
    I am surprised it is not code in UK ?
     
  8. darkwood
    Offline

    darkwood For it is a human number, its number is 666 Staff Member Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    West Yorkshire
    Regulations/codes usually have reasons behind them, with that in mind then, other than the dressing of the cable strands can you give a reason to why you cannot use the cable if it is suitably rated and its construction IE the insulation and sheath are of similar make-up, I cannot comment on USA or Australian codes as I don't know the cabling standards or the requirements for fine wire termination, I would assume the BS standards and cable standards may allow for the differences which we see.
     
  9. UKMeterman
    Offline

    UKMeterman Electrician's Arms

    Hi,
    A decent electrican should be able to produce something for you, discuss with the electrican your cable, you can easily get it in black, you can also get various clamps 743B PRO POWER, Cable Gland, M16, 3.5 mm, 11 mm, Nylon 6.6 (Polyamide 6.6), Black | Farnell element14 - http://uk.farnell.com/pro-power/743b/cord-grip-pa-11mm-m16-black/dp/3030740 that the electrian can then mount on a short length of metal trunking such as 2 x 2 Galvanised Steel Trunking - 3Mtr Length - https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/UVT2.html Just some ideas, but please ask a competent person to carry out the works.
     
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