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Discuss Swapping thermostats in the Central Heating Systems area at ElectrciansForums.co.uk.

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  1. SimonB2008
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    SimonB2008 EF Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    Hi there!
    I’m trying to swap a wired Lifestyle P111 heating programmer with a Netatmo thermostat.
    The Lifestyle has a blue, red and yellow wire and the Netatmo requires only two wires.
    I think I need to isolate the blue and connect the red and yellow to the Netatmo, but any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Photos attached.
    Thank you.

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  2. Leesparkykent
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    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    Doesn't the boiler relay have brown, blue, black and grey?
     
  3. SimonB2008
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    SimonB2008 EF Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    Hi Lee, thanks for your reply.
    I did not intend to connect the boiler relay to the boiler - I’d intended to use the plug in relay and switch out the heating controller for the Netatmo Thermostat. Main reason being I didn’t want to be left with a hole in the kitchen tiles.
     
  4. buzzlightyear
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    buzzlightyear Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    star command
    the lifestyle is for system boilers and open vented only. what type of boiler have you got.
     
  5. SimonB2008
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    SimonB2008 EF Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    Hi Buzz.
    We have a Worcester Combi boiler. There’s no hot water tank.
     
  6. Leesparkykent
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    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    You want to install the thermostat in the kitchen where it will get hot from cooking etc? This will not give you a true reflection of the houses temperature.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Leesparkykent
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    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    Do you have an existing thermostat as well as the single channel programmer?
     
  8. SimonB2008
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    SimonB2008 EF Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    Good point Lee. So I’d be better attaching the relay directly to the boiler and using the Netatmo in wireless mode.
    Would I be right in thinking that by doing this I’d also be disconnecting the old Lifestyle programmer and so would not need to insulate the wires in the kitchen?
     
  9. SimonB2008
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    SimonB2008 EF Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    No Lee -at the moment there is no thermostat in the house, just the programmer In the kitchen.
     
  10. Leesparkykent
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    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    Yeah it would be better to use the relay so you can position the thermostat in an appropriate position. You could put a blank plate on to cover the hole in the tiles. The cable that goes to the programmer is probably connected to the boiler and could be disconnected.
     
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  11. buzzlightyear
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    buzzlightyear Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    star command
    the thermostat needs to be in the coldest part of the building possible hallway
    and not near a radiator .
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Leesparkykent
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    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    I would position the thermostat in the most commonly used room, out of direct sunlight and out of direct drafts from doors opening etc. Make sure the room you install the thermostat in doesn't have a thermostatic rad valve. If it does you could change the TRV for a lock shield valve or simply turn it right up and remove the head or if it won't be fiddled with then just turn it right up. This way the thermostat and the thermostatic rad valve will not conflict with each other.
     
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    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. SimonB2008
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    SimonB2008 EF Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    You’ve been incredibly helpful Lee, much appreciated. Now I just need to identify the thermostat terminals in the Worcester 28cdi and I’m good to go!
     
  14. buzzlightyear
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    buzzlightyear Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    star command
    • Like Like x 1
  15. SimonB2008
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    SimonB2008 EF Member

    Location:
    Scotland
    Thanks Buzz, I’d just found this and was having a look. The diagram shows clearly where the LS / LR terminals are - I attached the black and grey relay wires to that, and then blue and brown wires to the power supply terminals. I’m guessing the wires for the prgorammer will be in the power supply terminals at the moment so i’ll take those out.
     
  16. Ross Banner
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    Ross Banner New EF Member

    Location:
    Mold
    Hello,

    Looking for some advice, I recently had to call upon a well know heating and plumbing insurance company to replace a faulty digital thermostat. They replaced it whilst I was on holiday with an analogue one. Which I was not pleased about for obvious reasons. I needed to establish a price to get this changed back to a digital one as they refused to come back to fit one. When I looked behind the fascia to see what wiring was there to support that I found 3 wires. 2 in the therm and one exposed and unlabelled. At this point I am really disappointed and thinking its not safe and whether or not they have done there due diligence or whether a digital and programmable (which I had before) can be fitted now. Does anyone have an opinion or knowledge on this? Thanks very much. Ross

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  17. buzzlightyear
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    buzzlightyear Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    star command
    I will not try be to rude ross. I think you might be biting of more the you can chew .
    do you self a favour get a spark in.
     
  18. Ross Banner
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    Ross Banner New EF Member

    Location:
    Mold
    Thanks for a very quick response!

    Agreed, I have no intention of messing with this lot as I don’t have the know how. The idea of checking behind was to see what kind of thermostat I would need (research only). The thing for me was I wanted to get a bit of a clue from someone who did know, is this potentially dangerous I.e. urgent that I need to get said insurer back out sharpish. Thanks.
     
  19. Leesparkykent
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    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    The bare conductor is the CPC and should be sleeved green and yellow and terminated in the far left terminal. The thermostat should ideally have a neutral which you don't have. The reason you should have a neutral connection with a mechanical thermostat such as the one that has been installed is to reduce the hysteresis of the bi-metal strip. With a line and neutral connection, the inbuilt resistor will heat the bi-metal strip in the thermostat so you don't get a big swing in temperature. Without this you will likely get a swing in temperature of around 3 degree above and below the desired set point before the heating turns off/on. With a digital thermostat, which you say you had before, you wouldn't usually suffer much hysterises as they are normally accurate to 1/4 to 1/2 a degree.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017

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