Posting a message to the forum will remove the above advertisement

Discuss Switch fed or feed to the light in the Electrical Forum area at ElectrciansForums.co.uk.

Tags:
Please make sure you checkout our forum sponsors, many do discounts for members and, they keep the forum free to use.
  1. magnoliafan89
    Offline

    magnoliafan89 EF Member

    Location:
    Hereford
    Hi guys

    Just for fun.
    Just wanted to find out a general opinion what is your preffered method of wiring a lighting circuit, looping in and out at the lights or switch fed?
    Just curious as whilst at college we were only ever shown feed to the lights but in my job we only ever switch feed so wondered what peoples preferences were?
     
  2. Midwest
    Offline

    Midwest Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Depends on the luminaires and the installation. Loop in & out at a ceiling rose is cheaper, uses less cable. Loop in & out at switch, is easier if installing down lights for example, and also provides a neutral at the switch for 'smart controls'.
     
    • Agree Agree x 7
    • Like Like x 2
  3. SparkyChick
    Offline

    SparkyChick Making a banana smoothy for my fave gorilla Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    South Wales
    Business Name:
    SparkyChick
    Loop In/Out at switch also reduces the chances of getting a badly done ceiling rose chocblock arrangement since the lights just have the one cable. Makes it easier for people to change their own light fittings.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 2
  4. Murdoch
    Offline

    Murdoch Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Woking
    At switch. There are too many noddy light fittings these days that can't accept loop in and out.

    Also makes it easier to fault find when the RCD starts tripping
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Davethesparks
    Offline

    Davethesparks Active EF Member

    Location:
    West London
    As above "noddy" light fittings cause problems, Conduit wiring can be done at the switch or light fitting again depending on fitting, T&E wiring also same
     
  6. Phil Thompson
    Offline

    Phil Thompson Let us light up your life! Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Newtownards
    Business Name:
    Brite Spark Electrical
    Loop in and out at lights is standard here. As is using singles, single with earth and twin brown for switching.
     
  7. Des 56
    Offline

    Des 56 Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Gliese 581C
    Both have their uses and both are used
    I suppose the loop at switches is more suitable for connection at the lights

    It is also sometimes handy to use a 3 core for the switch cable to the light for extending on in some cases
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. mhar
    Offline

    mhar Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    devon
    I tend to switch feed downstairs but may loop in / out of a ceiling rose if there is an attic.

    Ammendment 1, 18th edition - don't go giving them ideas
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. wirepuller
    Offline

    wirepuller Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    south uk
    Whatever suits each circumstance. Often a mixture of both on one circuit.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  10. buzzlightyear
    Offline

    buzzlightyear Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    star command
    new build from the switch less chance of numskull customers f**king up a light fitting .
    old houses looped at the light customer provide me with new light fittings.
    old jb if I can not get access to other part of the property .
     
  11. Karin
    Offline

    Karin Trainee Trainee Access

    Location:
    Kent
    on a ladder above my head screwing around working up to 5 cables into a piece of crap connection box / PIR arrangement or leaning against the wall infront of a nice deep backbox at handheight? well if i've got a choice..

    also agree (where practical) it's nice to leave neutrals and permanent lives at as many points as possible (Des' 3-core suggestion).
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Leesparkykent
    Offline

    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    New builds I feed the switches, rewires I generally 3 plate as 9 out of ten times I pull down the old conduits for the switch drops...I know for some reason a few very old school sparks frown upon feeding switches but for the life of me I can't see why. I once had a disagreement on here with a very well respected engineer who used to frequent the forum. He was adamant feeding the switches was a cowboy way of doing things...I said you try getting 3 or four cables in to some of these IKEA fittings or a wall light :eek:. Both methods have their uses.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
    • Like Like x 3
    • Winner Winner x 2
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
  13. Gavin John Hyde
    Offline

    Gavin John Hyde the lights are on but nobody is home

    Location:
    Kingswood
    Business Name:
    Sulis Electrical Services
    If a full rewire with good access or new installation then at the switch works well and i have found it quicker and less frustrating than trying to move little screws with your head arced backwards staring upwards... just make sure you got a good backbox for the switch method. If it is an existing installation then depending on the task at hand its often easier to use the existing method than change things. If i have a really awkward ceiling rose with little space i have in the past moved the wires into a junction box in the ceiling and done away with the current ceiling rose then dropped 1mm or 1.5mm down to the new light as some of these on trend lights have next to no cable space in them.
    Did this just last week. plenty of slack on existing wires so up in loft i pulled them back up, out come the wagos and mf wago box. then dropped a single 1.5mm down to the fancy artistic light the customer had bought. no way was more than one cable fitting into the back of it.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. Des 56
    Offline

    Des 56 Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Gliese 581C
    I always respected his opinion, even when it may have differed from my own
    I sometimes wonder what ever became of that very knowledgeable member
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  15. ferg
    Offline

    ferg Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    N.W.Scotland
    Either or both. Whatever suits me at the time.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. Leesparkykent
    Offline

    Leesparkykent You Rock Gmes Staff Member Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    Kent
    same here mate...
     
  17. Murdoch
    Offline

    Murdoch Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Woking
    He's on another forum - if you are referring to the one i'm thinking of.
     
  18. wirepuller
    Offline

    wirepuller Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    south uk
    I think some peoples opposition to the N at a switch harks back to the days of round pattern switches on wooden blocks when clearly there was nowhere to terminate a spare wire. The belief that neutrals at switches are poor practice has simply been handed down over generations without any thought for changes in practice and accessories.
    The fact is that any of the arguments against neutrals at switches can also be applied to permanent lives at lights. Which is why common sense has prevailed in the end!
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  19. Midwest
    Offline

    Midwest Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    I see you lot have no issues with neutrals at light switches, but don't like them turning up at job interviews ;)
     
    • Funny Funny x 8
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  20. Loki
    Online

    Loki Trainee Trainee Access

    Location:
    Devon
    Ive seen some that use both ie t&e to rose 3 core from rose to switch then t&e back to next rose then repeat. Gets a neautral at both then
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  21. Dave OCD
    Offline

    Dave OCD Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Business Name:
    Hendry Electrical Services
    I'll use both though mainly loop through the switches, sometimes on rewires though for the ground floor lighting I'll go with the old everything back to a big JB method. :eek::)
     
  22. telectrix
    Offline

    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    cheshire/staffordshire
    Business Name:
    Telectrix
    big JB???? don't you mean a large JB ( Jim Beam)?
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  23. Dave OCD
    Offline

    Dave OCD Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Business Name:
    Hendry Electrical Services
    Junction box. :rolleyes:
     
  24. telectrix
    Offline

    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    cheshire/staffordshire
    Business Name:
    Telectrix
    junction box, buried under 2 ft. of itchy-poo and nobody except you knows where it is? YUK.
     
  25. Dave OCD
    Offline

    Dave OCD Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Business Name:
    Hendry Electrical Services
    No GROUND floor lighting, so under a floorboard 'hatch' [MF of course:rolleyes:] or in a cupboard on the 1st floor. :)
     
  26. telectrix
    Offline

    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    cheshire/staffordshire
    Business Name:
    Telectrix
    is that over or under the 4" of kingspan between floors, and will it be affected by the heat from the underfloor bedroom wet heating system?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  27. stummish
    Offline

    stummish Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    leeds
    I tend to do either, depends on the circuit routes. I prefer loop at the switch, easier to terminate, harder for the general public to zap themselves on imo.

    I also tend to use 3 core for switch wires, n or p live at either point for gadgets, or an extra s live for modifications/variations.

    @Dave OCD@Dave OCD I also have been known to do the big ol' jb method, but only if there's a cupboard or similar to put it. I like my jbs like I like my women... not covered in insulation and hidden under floorboards. Pretty specific I suppose...
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
  28. telectrix
    Offline

    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    cheshire/staffordshire
    Business Name:
    Telectrix
    like I like my women... not covered in insulation and hidden under floorboards.

    does that mean I've got to move the ex-wife from under the floor?
     
  29. stummish
    Offline

    stummish Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    leeds
    Some assembly required o_O
     
  30. Dave OCD
    Offline

    Dave OCD Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Cornwall
    Business Name:
    Hendry Electrical Services
    Now I'm talking about rewiring Tel, nothing under the floor apart from soot and cobwebs, usually older Victorian houses. So stop being awkward. :p
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  31. ashg285
    Offline

    ashg285 Regular EF Member

    Location:
    manchester
    I prefer to feed at the switches, although i must say the area I work in when on repairs or renewing fittings the majority are fed at the lights. Like someone has mentioned when fitting tenants fancy light fittings all them wires can be a bit awkward at times
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  32. JK-Electrical
    Offline

    JK-Electrical Politically Incorrect Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Business Name:
    JK Electrical
    I often find that Sod's Law applies here.

    For instance, when I'm installing additional smoke alarms in modern properties that have sheeted flooring and plasterboard walls throughout, neither of which the property owner wants damaged in any way, it is very rare to find that a loop-in system has been installed via ceiling lighting points. The obvious advantage with the ceiling loop-in method, is, of course, that the wiring for the alarm can be taken direct from the ceiling lighting point and fed through the ceiling void without any ceiling damage being incurred. But when the feeds are located at switch points, it is more often than not next to impossible to install wiring between the switch and the alarm without having to open up the adjacent wall and the ceiling, in which case the alarms would need to be installed on the wall rather than the ceiling.

    Conversely, when the job is a light fitting changeover in older properties, I often find that a ceiling loop-in system is present. As other posters have pointed-out, it can be fiddly working at a height with a fancy light fitting and three pairs of 1.5 T&E. In this particular instance there is a distinct disadvantage and you end-up wishing that the feeds were at the switch rather than the light.

    Both approaches or a combination thereof have advantages and disadvantages. In the end, it all comes down to what type of job you're doing and whether or not the law of Sod comes into play!
     
    • Like Like x 3
  33. telectrix
    Offline

    telectrix Scouser and Proud of It Trusted Advisor

    Location:
    cheshire/staffordshire
    Business Name:
    Telectrix
    what i prefer doing with a fancy light fitting that is terrible to get 3 x T/E in is to fit a JB above the ceiling to handle the loop in/out (accessible from the light) and a single cable ( S/L, N & E) into the fitting.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  34. JK-Electrical
    Offline

    JK-Electrical Politically Incorrect Electrician's Arms

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Business Name:
    JK Electrical
    That's what I prefer to do too. Saves time and hassle.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Switch feed light Forum Date
Help wiring a lightswitch - Two-dimmer switch controlling two light fittings in kitchen Electrical Forum Saturday at 3:27 PM
Pir light + switched light Lighting Forum Wednesday at 7:07 PM

Share This Page

  • Electricians Directory Post a Domestic Job Post a Commercial Job